2012

2012-11-29 18:00
2012-12-16 16:00
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PhotoAccess offers residency opportunities to a number of artists each year. An aim of the residency program is to assist emerging artists to develop their practice and present work to a wider audience.

Support for artists in residence includes PhotoAccess membership, use of facilities and equipment, access to courses and workshops, help with grants applications, mentoring and advice, technical and creative support and, in some cases, exhibition opportunities.

PhotoAccess is a strong supporter of the ANU School of Art’s Emerging Artists Support Scheme (EASS): two of our residencies each year are awarded to School of Art final year graduates. Jack Brandtman and Holly Granville-Edge are our residents from the 2011 graduating year. Support from the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy allows us to help emerging artists show their work as part of the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program—for some this is their first solo exhibition, helping build a bridge between their student and future lives as contemporary visual artists.

Brandtman’s work has attracted commissions and a number of awards in the past year. Interval is a very personal, conceptually and technically sophisticated work and PhotoAccess is delighted to present it to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-11-29 18:00
2012-12-16 16:00
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PhotoAccess offers residency opportunities to a number of artists each year. An aim of the residency program is to assist emerging artists to develop their practice and present work to a wider audience.

Support for artists in residence includes PhotoAccess membership, use of facilities and equipment, access to courses and workshops, help with grants applications, mentoring and advice, technical and creative support and, in some cases, exhibition opportunities.

PhotoAccess is a strong supporter of the ANU School of Art’s Emerging Artists Support Scheme (EASS): two of our residencies each year are awarded to School of Art final year graduates. Holly Granville-Edge and Jack Brandtman are our residents from the 2011 graduating year. Support from the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy allows us to help emerging artists show their work as part of the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program—for some this is their first solo exhibition, helping build a bridge between their student and future lives as contemporary visual artists.

The work in Chimera and the work we saw in her graduate year exhibition suggests that Holly Granville-Edge's main creative interest is a serious one, albeit one sometimes cloaked in humour. Her images deal with questions of perception and self. She is designer, model and photographer in most of her thought provoking, very original images.

Granville-Edge touches on these issues in her artist statement for Chimera:

'The chimera can be a metaphor for the self. We operate with various shades of physical, emotional, practical, and intellectual selves all sheltering within the one being. No single element can utterly describe the whole'.

The clever manipulations in these images are not obvious. Detection requires close inspection, just as we should all perform a more than superficial assessment before we judge others.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Holly Granville-Edge’s Chimera to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-11-08 18:00
2012-11-25 16:00
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Each year we select graduates from the Canberra Institute of Technology and the ANU School of Art for PhotoAccess emerging artist residencies. The intention is to assist those artists, most young and with limited exhibition experience, to develop and present new work in HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions. The residencies involve mentoring, courses, access to facilities and equipment and, towards the end of each residency, exhibition opportunities. Exhibitions are assisted by funding under the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy.

From the 2011 CIT graduating year we offered residencies to two photographers with more experience than most recent graduates. Ginette Snow and Stephen Corey have established reputations for mature and recognisably individual work over the past two years. They have both received awards for high academic achievement and shown work in PhotoAccess and other group exhibitions, including the Head On Photo Festival.

We first saw Ginette Snow’s empathetic and strong Just Families images in MOMENTUM, the December 2011 exhibition by CIT students at the Old Bus Depot Markets at Kingston. Ginette has gone on to make other same sex family portraits since that time and presented a selection at INDEX space in Sydney earlier this year as part of the Head On Photo Festival.

This large group of the Just Families works demonstrates the palpable familial love shared by Snow’s subjects and raises questions about our democracy. How can the right of same sex couples to marry be ignored by politicians when the overwhelming view of electors favours legislating for what should be considered a basic human right?

The exhibition was printed by Stephen Best from Macquarie Editions; it is a tour de force of the printer’s art.

We are delighted to share Ginette Snow’s Just Families with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2012-11-08 18:00
2012-11-25 16:00
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Each year we select graduates from the Canberra Institute of Technology and the ANU School of Art for PhotoAccess emerging artist residencies. The intention is to assist those artists, most young and with limited exhibition experience, to develop and present new work in HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions. The residencies involve mentoring, courses, access to facilities and equipment and, towards the end of each residency, exhibition opportunities. Exhibitions are assisted by funding under the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy.

From the 2011 CIT graduating year we offered residencies to two photographers with more experience than most recent graduates. Stephen Corey and Ginette Snow have established reputations for mature and recognisably individual work over the past two years. They have both received awards for high academic achievement and shown work in PhotoAccess and other group exhibitions, including the Head On Photo Festival.

We first saw Stephen Corey’s remarkable family based images in Access all areas 2011: The PhotoAccess Members Show. When we came upon his final year images in MOMENTUM, the December 2011 exhibition by CIT students at the Old Bus Depot Markets at Kingston we instantly recognised his signature lighting style and quirky sense of humour. Corey’s family have been willing collaborators in the making of the striking images that make up the On Holydays series shown here as part of his alpha waves, beta waves exhibition.

The second part of the exhibition also owes a considerable debt to family members in a very different, more serious but, as always with Corey, thoughtful take on the human condition.

Stephen Corey has joined our teaching staff in recent months and we are delighted to share his alpha waves, beta waves with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2012-09-27 18:00
2012-10-04 16:00
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George Serras is a PhotoAccess Life Member, an honour awarded for his outstanding contribution to the organisation in the 1990s when PhotoAccess was located in its original Kingsley Street premises. George was a volunteer, committee member and tutor for some years and then our Workshop Manager from 1995 to 1997 before he left to become Senior Photographer at the National Museum of Australia where he still works.

Although he contributed to our 25th Anniversary Life Members exhibition, In for life in 2009, Serras has seldom shown work in Canberra despite working professionally as a photographer for more than 25 years.

It might be said that George Serras was overdue for an exhibition; this oversight has now been addressed in this his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. We are pleased to be playing a part in sharing the beautiful, sensitive black and white images of this outstanding photographer with a wider audience.

Serras speaks about the background to this work, made in the course of a 2011 volunteer assignment at the Luang Prabang National Museum, in his Artist Statement, and about the motivating force for the exhibition in these terms:

'While capturing the images of the monks and novices, I realised that I was creating a body of work that reflected an intimate and genuine life within the temple, displaying simplicity, spirituality and internal beauty. Many monks and novices had come to the temple due to poverty (their parents could no longer support them), others to gain an education and eventually employment. Some saw it as a stepping-stone in their life while others had indicated that they’d remain for their entire lives. The images reflect the timeless quality of life in the temple community'.

We are given a privileged look at this very different culture and the lives of these remarkable people through George Serras’s lens courtesy of his finely attuned eye. While the images in Dharma – life in a Laotian temple have the gravitas and implicit spirituality Serras experienced during his visits to the temple, warm humanity and humour are also clearly a part of the everyday lives of its monks and novices.

Serras will donate proceeds from the exhibition to assist a Vientiane based organisation, Cooperative Orthotic and Prosthetic Enterprise (COPE), with its prostheses manufacturing and rehabilitation programs.

PhotoAccess is delighted to welcome George Serras back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this beautiful and impressive work.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-08-16 18:00
2012-09-02 16:00
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Wedding photography seemed an odd career choice for Dan O’Day following his very successful 2006 exhibition 'Still' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. Variously a painter, singer in a rock band, occasional bureaucrat and emerging photo artist at that time, 'Still' looked set to put him on course to a different career.

We can be grateful O’Day’s runaway success as a wedding photographer over the past six years hasn’t distracted him from the importance of creating and showing evocative new work. 'I closed my eyes and saw this' is the result of his latest imagining, an imagination he applies to and which is, I am certain, the reason for his success as a commercial photographer.

In a conversation with him some years ago O’Day said he approached all of his weddings as if he was shooting for an exhibition. This approach has resulted in a large body of outstanding wedding images that could themselves make for an inspiring exhibition.

Canberra continues to provide a base for O’Day when he is not travelling in Australia and overseas for wedding assignments or to pick up awards. He has maintained contact with PhotoAccess and contributes to our work generally and to group exhibitions from time to time. His solo exhibitions have kept him in touch with the gallery world, particularly in Melbourne through the CATHERINE ASQUITH GALLERY, and his work is represented in private and corporate collections in Australia and overseas.

Writing about his 'Still' exhibition in 2006 I said that:

'While the tradition of storytelling in photography is a time honoured one, going back almost to its beginnings, Dan O’Day’s approach to pictorial narrative is unmistakeably of his time … While there is beauty on the surface of these evocative, occasionally menacing and at times whimsical images, they are richly suggestive of the vast dimensions of stillness and being alone— and of the occasionally dark implications of both. … Questions of meaning and intention can’t be avoided in the face of Dan O’Day’s images'.

Those comments apply equally to the work in 'I closed my eyes and saw this', where O’Day continues to reflect on life and his experience of it. Perhaps things are improving: as he says in his brief Artist Statement ‘To be here in this moment is easier than it used to be, and that ‘stillness’ I used to run from, I now find myself running toward’. We are pleased Dan O’Day continues to embrace life in all its light and darker dimensions and delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

Small prints list

2012-07-26 18:00
2012-08-12 16:00
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We first saw Laila Kazak’s work at the end of 2011 in the graduating students’ exhibition at the ANU School of Art. Leila completed her Bachelor of Arts (Digital Arts) with Honours at the ANU in 2011.

We were struck by the conceptual and technical innovation of Laila’s work and thought it should be made available to a wider audience. Laila was invited to show the work in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room this year and this is its first showing in a public art gallery. Laila has described the project in these terms:

'For my Honours practice, I attempted to remove the reliance on the ‘camera’s eye’ in video-art. By projecting and re-filming footage until it lost all clarity, and through the use of large lenses, the resulting works were devoid of any explicit relation to ‘what’ the works were recordings ‘of’; that is, what the camera originally captured.

In revisiting the works, I have removed them further from video and towards photography. I have converted each video (which is an infinite loop) into a colour paper negative, and used an enlarger to project the image. This broadens the scope of my original aims to include comment on the comparisons between the photograph that can be made explicitly tactile through the enlarger, and video, which may end with the projection, on screen or otherwise'.

'Peri genesin' is presented here through the lenses of two large format enlargers operated by control panels. The interplay of the enlargers and the sounds of filters changing brings a new dimension to this exhibition of the work.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Laila Kazak’s 'Peri genesin' to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-07-26 18:00
2012-08-12 16:00
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Images: Alan Charlton and Judy Parker

Members have opportunities to show work in three group exhibitions this year. 'Winter Postcards' is the second members’ exhibition for 2012, giving everyone a chance to share their work and the incidents and emotions of their recent winters.

'Hang it yourself 2012' is the next exhibition open to all members, beginning on 18 October and running to 4 November. Our major Centenary of Canberra project, '100 Views of Canberra', is also open to all members. I encourage you to read the detailed information on the PhotoAccess website and join in this exciting effort to tell the story of Canberra only Canberrans know.

As with last year’s 'Winter Holiday Snaps', some members have stayed local and some have brought back images from far away holidays, sharing a mix of exotic places and faces with us. Karen Dace, Elizabeth Casling, John Boyd Macdonald and Alan Charlton’s evocative landscapes couldn’t be more reminiscent of the chill of winter. As too Judy Parker’s beautiful abstractions of cold, hard machinery parts made elegant by frost. Ginette Snow’s 'Stacks', with hints of Rosemary Gascoigne’s famous found object works, suggest the cool of winter in meticulous patterning and colour choices. Julie Garran, Shan Crosbie and Darren Weinert have shown us faces of winter in other countries.

But not everything is so literally representative of winter. Hayley King’s series suggests a memorable time in her life; Kerry Baylor’s grim images allude to holidays in warmer places. As with 'Winter Holiday Snaps' last year there is diversity and plenty to admire and think about in 'Winter Postcards 2012'.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-05-22 18:00
2012-06-07 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
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Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-05-24 18:00
2012-06-07 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
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Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-05-03 18:00
2012-05-20 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 3 to 20 May 2012
 
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Image: Julie Garran, Backyard 1

Access all areas 2012 represents PhotoAccess in all its diversity with 107 works by 57 members—from black and white prints made by hand in the PhotoAccess darkroom to astounding, sophisticated digital images by Josh Dykgraaf and Ed Whalan, and Scott Newman’s beautiful tintypes reminding us of the earliest processes of photography.

It’s interesting to speculate on the motivation of members in making and presenting work. Scott Newman says his interest in the tintype came about ‘… after searching for a way to make photographs that were not only about the image but also about the object.’ Sean Davey’s two works seem to call up the memory of personal moments in an innovative and evocative way. For Julie Garran making work is often about family, and her quirky images could not have been made without the cooperation of close, very willing tiny people. Kerry Reed-Gilbert’s My land, my spirit and The road to somewhere connect to her cultural roots as does Jo Kamira’s Ta Moko. Suan Chin Wong’s Spring celebrates a time of quiet contemplation on the verdant shores of Lake Burley Griffin.

We welcome those who are showing in a members’ show for the first time this year. We are pleased to see images from three members we have worked with on a digital storytelling project with Karralika supported by the 2012 ACT Arts Fund. Josie Alexandra, Joel Johnsson and Emily Sargeson are young members presenting work for the first time.

Seeing work on the wall, particularly in the context of a group show, is a real learning opportunity for artists and one of the very important outcomes of our members’ exhibitions. This year’s postcards show from 26 July to 12 August and Hang It Yourself from 18 October to 4 November are the next shows open to all members.

The continuing involvement of artists who have had solo HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions is very pleasing. This year they include Andrée Lawrey, Barb Smith, John Macdonald, Kerry Baylor, Ian Copland, Suzie Edwards, Julie Garran, Lauren Hewitt, Barbie Robinson, Lorna Sim, Tony Stewart, Josh Wodak and Ed Whalan. Two of our current artists in residence, Robert Agostino with two striking black and white prints and Julia Boyd, with her liquid emulsion portraits Ben 1 and 2 are represented in Access all areas 2012.

Also represented in the show are board members and advisers who volunteer their time and expertise to help PhotoAccess with its work (Bob Burne, Ian Copland, Lauren Hewitt and Tony Stewart); staff members; tutors—Jane Duong and Richard Scherer in particular; and volunteers (including Alan Charlton).

Engaging and challenging work has become the standard for PhotoAccess members shows, and Access all areas 2012 continues the tradition.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-04-05 18:00
2012-04-29 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
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Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

Catalogue

2012-03-15 18:00
2012-04-01 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 15 March to 1 April 2012
 
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Image: Ian Copland, Samakand Market

Markets is Ian Copland’s fifth HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition and a real departure from his previous work. Structures, shown in 2007, was an outstanding first exhibition based on the architecture of three of Canberra’s national institutions. The people and streetscape of Garema Place, more than just a street address for generations of Canberra people, were the focus for Garema shown in 2009. People, 2008, dealt with universal themes of humankind and had no specific Canberra connection. Brindabella, 2010, examined places close to home in rich black and white landscape images of the iconic Brindabella Ranges.

In Markets Copland has gone much further afield, to the Silk Road, to places where the first meaning of the word ‘market’ persists today. This work is a slideshow with music. The format has allowed Copland to use many more images than he could have done in a print based exhibition and the accompanying music adds brilliantly to the images creating a lively, colourful and authentic story of the places he visited and the trade in food and other things essential to the people of those places and their daily lives.

This like all of his work reflects Copland’s abiding interest in people and places. He refers to this interest in his artist statement:

'In this slideshow I return to a personal love—capturing people involved in everyday life … In many cities and towns around the world markets or bazaars are the significant focal point for the community They are a true reflection of the culture of the local community. Wherever I have travelled I have been drawn to this ‘real’ look at the local people and culture'

PhotoAccess is pleased to welcome Ian Copland back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY, this time in the Multimedia Room, with Markets.

Catalogue

2012-03-15 18:00
2012-04-01 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 15 March to 1 April 2012
 
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Image: Josh Wodak, entre naturaleza y cultura

Josh Wodak visited Spain in 2010 and was made a PhotoAccess artist in residence last year to develop an exhibition based on the visit. Sense of Surroundings is an important outcome of the project. In recent years he has also had residencies at the ANU School of Art and the Australian Film Television and Radio School.

Since 2009 Josh Wodak has shown always thoughtful images in a number of PhotoAccess group exhibitions in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY, but this is his first solo show with us.

Wodak’s images in Sense of Surroundings achieve what most good photographers aspire to achieve, taking us to a distinct place and time, sharing something of the moment of creation. Writing about that moment Wodak says he ‘… sensed ‘something’, [but] making sense of that ‘something’ is ever elusive.’

This is an intriguing group of works, works that clearly have a narrative intent but contain few hints to help us read the artist’s ‘sense’, albeit elusive, of the places and people he has chosen to show. Wodak’s titles don’t make the task easier. But I suspect that is the artist’s purpose—to encourage us to take the time and make the effort to conjure up stories. And not necessarily the stories that might be told by Wodak himself or the unwitting players in these tableaux created with an eye sensitive to the interplay of character and place. The images are carefully and effectively composed and lit, and rich in local colour and imaginative possibilities.

The project was supported by the Spanish Cultural Cooperation Program between the Spanish Ministry of Culture and the ANU Centre for European Studies, and by Hang Ups Picture Framing. Stephen Best from Macquarie Editions printed the images. We are pleased to share Josh Wodak’s Sense of Surroundings with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-02-23 18:00
2012-03-11 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 23 February to 11 March 2012
 
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Image: John Boyd Macdonald, Bangli cremation #2

John Boyd Macdonald’s travel photographs are a cut above the rest. Their technical excellence and fine composition are obvious, but legions of photographers have these skills. At PhotoAccess we see many examples of very good travel photography.

So when Macdonald approached us with the idea for an exhibition based on images made in Bali it didn’t at first seem an interesting enough idea to merit inclusion in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY program. Bali has such a strong presence in the Australian psyche as a place marked forever by the atrocious carnage of 12 October 2002 and 1 October 2005 and, perhaps incongruously, for the opportunities it offers to multitudes of tourists who continue to flock there from all over the world. Its image abroad as a risky pleasure ground seemed to sum up everything we needed to know about Bali.

So what could make this exhibition interesting and important enough to justify the cost, time and effort of the artist and PhotoAccess in developing and presenting it? This is a question we increasingly ask as pressure on our gallery program increases.

The answer lies in Macdonald’s inquisitiveness and the successful expression in these beautiful and evocative images of lessons he learned about a people with rich traditions and culture during a period working, with his wife Karen, as a volunteer in Bali in 2009–10. Sekala: ritual and ceremony in Bali brings to us a fresh view of the Balinese, their values and way of life, which contradicts the conventional wisdom about our near neighbour. Through their ceremonies and rituals and the beliefs that underpin them the Balinese have enviable lives beyond their earthly presence.

Macdonald addresses this in his artist statement:

'The Balinese have a neat concept for this: they speak of ‘Sekala’, which is the surface layer of our experience—that which is visible, the tangible. Beneath lies ‘Niskala’, the hidden world which explains and animates the surface layer, full of gods, spirits, ancestors—the balanced and opposing forces of good and evil. Images in this exhibition may only deal explicitly with Sekala, but will hopefully offer glimpses into the underlying world of Niskala'.

A half hour video slideshow with music and voiceovers accompanies the wall works.

PhotoAccess is delighted to share John Boyd Macdonald’s Sekala: ritual and ceremony in Bali with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-02-09 18:00
2012-02-19 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 9 to 19 February 2012
 
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Image: Belinda Pratten, Adrianna Alvarez 1

Belinda Pratten has been associated with PhotoAccess for many years. In my catalogue introduction for Esperanza—her June 2010 solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess—I wrote about Belinda:

Belinda Pratten’s work as a photographer and filmmaker has taken her to many places, physically and emotionally—managing the pictures bureau for the Australian Financial Review, documenting the release of rehabilitated orangutans in Borneo’s Meratus forests, assignments for Greenpeace, teaching in Brewarrina and at the Canberra Institute of Technology. The face we most often see is through the multitude of always intriguing and beautifully made entries in PhotoAccess group exhibitions and Belinda’s memorable 1994 The Surfer in the PhotoAccess 25th Anniversary Print Portfolio.

Since June 2010 she has contributed to group shows, completed freelance still image and film projects and taught part time at the Canberra Institute of Technology. She also found the time to participate in the Memories from Fire project instigated by Jorge Bagnini, Multicultural Arts Officer with the former ACT Community Arts Office, leading to this exhibition. The Memories from Fire project also involved Lucas Yuwaganit Li whose short film is presented in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room. Lucas is a Canberra based film teacher and freelance filmmaker.

PhotoAccess is delighted to welcome Belinda Pratten back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with her beautiful, soulful images, and to show Lucas Yuwaganit Li’s work for the first time. It is appropriate that Memories from Fire is showing to coincide with the 2012 National Multicultural Festival.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-11-08 16:00
2012-11-25 18:00
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Cecilia Martin and Luca Barton are Year 10 students at Blue Gum Community School in Hackett. They have spent one day weekly for six months at PhotoAccess as Community Research Interns following a darkroom based photography course earlier in the year. Important outcomes of the placement included developing expertise and ‘real-life’ skills. We have enjoyed hosting Cecilia and Luca and I think they have each developed their creative and critical thinking skills remarkably well.

Cecelia and Luca responded enthusiastically to our suggestion that they should present a small body of new work in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room as one significant outcome of their time with us. Cecelia chose to make images in the charged atmosphere of the theatre while rehearsing a self-directed performance piece. As she says, ‘I saw the emotion that I experienced every day of the production but—in the dark contrast of the theatre space we were working in—it was magnified’. In Underground Cecelia Martin successfully represents for us the mood, shared energy and anxiety that goes with circus performance.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Cecelia Martin’s Underground to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-11-08 18:00
2012-11-25 16:00
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Luca Barton and Cecilia Martin are Year 10 students at Blue Gum Community School in Hackett. They have spent one day weekly for six months at PhotoAccess as Community Research Interns following a darkroom based photography course earlier in the year. Important outcomes of the placement included developing expertise and ‘real-life’ skills. We have enjoyed hosting Luca and Cecilia and I think they have each developed their creative and critical thinking skills remarkably well.

Luca and Cecilia responded enthusiastically to our suggestion that they should present a small body of new work in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room as one significant outcome of their time with us. Luca chose to make photographs in the green open spaces of Mitchell but the particular light and mood he found moved him to try ‘… to convey a sense of an apocalyptic setting … I then thought about how an environment that is so relaxed could be so sinister. I was on private property and I was hoping no one would kick me out. The horses that looked so peaceful and calm were in the recovery section of an animal clinic … Even when everything seems okay it is sometimes far from that’.

Luca also presented four intriguing images in Hang it yourself 2012, our third and final members’ exhibition for this year.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Luca Barton’s Mitchell Green to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-10-18 18:00
2012-11-04 16:00
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Hang it yourself (HIY) was conceived as a photographic interpretation of street art, accessible to everyone, a bit anarchic, an easy way for first time and experienced artists to show work. But from the beginning with HIY 2008, HIY-time has become a worrying time for members. Their worries include the challenge of creating and presenting something noticeable, something different and something of quality. They visit those worries on the hard working staff of PhotoAccess and we willingly accept responsibility for advising on selection, printing, placement and the many other concerns members bring to us at HIY-time.

Of course nobody really needs to worry. HIY this year is, again, a great success, representing a wide variety of subjects, media and participants—established and first time.

We are pleased with the number of members accepting the challenge and showing with us for the first time, including Jack Hugonnet (at 14 years our youngest contributor), brothers Guy and Luca Barton, also among our youngest members, Leo Broska, Dexter Cruez, Mel Edwards, Gillian Freeman, Stephanie Henry and Kate Travis. Jack Harman and Sarah Driscoll have followed on from their participation in the recent SNAP exhibition (a survey of the best work by ACT senior secondary school students) with five very accomplished images each.

Ginette Snow’s earthy Textured Boots series speaks of the hard graft of redeveloping Canberra Airport. Ginette will have a solo HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition following HIY 2012, opening on 8 November. Tabitha Mann’s arresting and exquisitely lit portraits of twin sisters are the best images she has contributed to PhotoAccess group shows since she was one of our youngest participants only two years ago. Chris Jones’ towering cityscapes are memorable. Judy Parker’s beautiful Waterworks series extends her long standing reputation for showing outstanding images in our members’ exhibitions. Deidre Campbell has given us a series of evocative black and white images and Trevor Lund has found night subjects in the streets of Prague and young lovers in the alleyways of its picturesque Novy Svet quarter.

The involvement of artists who have had solo HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions is very pleasing. This year they include Kerry Baylor, Suzie Edwards, Julie Garran, Erica Hurrell, Andrée Lawrey, Marie Lund, Barbie Robinson and Christine Rufflet. Staff members and Jane Duong, one of our most popular course tutors, are also represented in HIY 2012.

Members and other visitors will make their own assessments of the work and take away from HIY 2012 ideas that will, we hope, help them to develop their own work.

Congratulations to everyone who has participated in HIY 2012, making it another outstanding and memorable HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition by PhotoAccess members.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-09-06 18:00
2012-09-23 16:00
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SNAP is a survey of photographic work by students from 13 ACT senior secondary schools and colleges—the first time teachers and students across the ACT education system have come together to present work in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY and, most likely, any public gallery in Canberra. PhotoAccess is pleased to have played a part in this ground breaking exhibition.

SNAP has allowed young artists to experience the process involved in conceiving and making work for an exhibition. Through the exhibition they will share ideas, techniques and approaches with their peers and visitors to the gallery and, we hope, gain skills and confidence to go on making and showing work.

All ACT schools and colleges offering the BSSS (Board of Senior Secondary Studies) photography course as part of a Tertiary or Accredited package were invited to submit up to three entries from current Year 11 and 12 photography students. Works in the exhibition were selected by school photography teachers.

The schools and the teachers who worked with their students to present this survey exhibition are:

• Burgmann Anglican School, teacher Cherie Robinson
• Canberra College, teacher Stephanie Smith
• Canberra Girls Grammar School, teacher s Elizabeth Chase and Tara Shield
• Dickson College, teacher Lisa Styles
• Erindale College, teacher Mark Will
• Gungahlin College, teacher Doug Hendry
• Hawker College, teacher Richard Baldwin
• Marist College, teacher Alister McDonald
• Melba Copland Secondary School, teacher Terry Eveston
• Radford College, teacher Jonquil Mackey
• St Clare's College, teacher Hetty Neil
• St Francis Xavier College, teacher Joanne Dougherty
• UCSSC Lake Ginninderra, teachers Samuel Townsend and Mary Woodhouse

Visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY will come to their own conclusions about the diverse interests and concerns of this very talented group of young Canberra artists. PhotoAccess is proud to have helped give them a platform for sharing their engaging and thoughtful images. We hope they will continue to do so through the group exhibition opportunities available to PhotoAccess members and, as an incentive, we have offered each of the artists a free one year PhotoAccess membership.

Tara Shield was particularly instrumental in conceiving and organising SNAP. Peter Blackshaw Real Estate assisted with the costs of the exhibition.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-07-05 18:00
2012-07-22 16:00
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Jenni Kemarre Martiniello is a poet, writer, visual and glass artist. She was born in Adelaide of Arrente, Chinese and Anglo-Celtic descent, Kemarre skin. Her grandmother was born at Charlotte Waters; her father at Hookey’s Waterhole near Oodnadatta. She has four children, six grandchildren, one great-grandchild and is one of the busiest, most adventurous artists living in Canberra.

Martiniello was awarded the Canberra Critics Circle Award for Literature in 2000 and for Visual Arts in 2011, was an ACT Creative Arts Fellow in 2003 and the ACT NAIDOC Artist of the Year in 2009. Jenni has published five books and her poetry, prose and essays have been published nationally and internationally. Between 1985 and 2012 her work has been included in more than 75 exhibitions. She is represented in private and public collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, National Museum of Australia, Canberra Museum and Gallery, Art Gallery of Western Australia and National Museum of Belau, Koror, Palau.

Jenni Kemarre Martiniello was one of three artists involved in the second PhotoAccess Indigenous Artist Digital Storytelling project in 2007 and her River story, inkjet prints and fabric banners were shown in our 2007 NAIDOC Week exhibition. She has shown work in several of our group exhibitions since that time.

Grandmothers’ Countries by Jenni Kemarre Martiniello is our contribution to 2012 NAIDOC Week. It includes images and a small selection of Martiniello’s exquisite recent glass works. PhotoAccess is privileged to welcome Jenni back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY for her first solo exhibition with us and only her second solo exhibition of photographic work.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-06-14 18:00
2012-07-01 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
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Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-06-14 18:00
2012-07-01 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
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Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-04-05 18:00
2012-04-29 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
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'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2012-04-05 18:00
2012-04-29 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
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I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue