2011

2011-08-05 16:14
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 4 to 21 August 2011
 
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Riley Post completed his Bachelor of Arts (Digital Arts) with Honours at the ANU School of Art in 2010. We first saw Tracing the Invisible at the end of 2010 in the graduating students exhibition at the School of Art and thought it should have a public gallery showing.

The work is a brilliantly realised interaction of visual images and sound. Although Riley has given us a succinct impression of Tracing the Invisible in his Artist Statement, this is a more detailed explanation:

Tracing the Invisible aims to simulate a sense of synaesthesia by making images the product of sound, and making both the sound and the image cohesively present in a space. In a room isolated from distractions, the screen becomes a beacon for the eyes, while sound is present—both as the generator of the image, and as a sensory stimulus in itself. The sound and image are programmatically connected in real time.

The screen is handmade from wood and wax paper, and bears the imperfections of its materials. This removes it somewhat from the transparency of the screen as a medium, and from the screens that daily show us television, film and the internet. An imperfect screen colours the perception of the image cast upon it.

The sound heard has been carefully chosen for certain characteristics—both aesthetic and physical. Some pieces are predominantly high frequencies, while others are lower, and many are a mix. The balance of frequencies alters how the images react; the rate of movement and colour shift in particular.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Riley Post’s Tracing the Invisible in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-12-08 18:00
2012-01-29 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 8 December 2011 to 29 January 2012
 
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Images: Natalie Azzopardi, Clover and Cat

PhotoAccess offers residency opportunities to a number of artists each year. An aim of the residency program is to assist emerging artists to develop their practice and present work to a wider audience.

Support for artists in residence includes PhotoAccess membership, use of facilities and equipment, access to courses and workshops, help with grants applications, mentoring and advice, technical and creative support and, in some cases, exhibition opportunities.

PhotoAccess is a strong supporter of the ANU School of Art’s Emerging Artists Support Scheme (EASS): two of our residencies each year are awarded to School of Art final year graduates. Natalie Azzopardi and Katherine Griffiths are our residents from the 2010 graduating year. Support from the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy allows us to help emerging artists show their work as part of the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. For many this is their first solo exhibition, helping build a bridge between their student and future lives as contemporary visual artists.

Unlike many of our artists in residence, Natalie Azzopardi has been a consistent visitor through 2011. She has used the darkroom and other facilities and participated in several courses. The work in 'Beyond the Laughing Sky' has a connection with PhotoAccess, but a much stronger link with Azzopardi’s imagination. She says it is:

'… a frozen world, preserved and presented as a ‘Wunderkammer’ or cabinet of curiosities … I have combined many different elements from my past including pattern and objects, which embody a memory, time or place, creating a delicate imagery with the unrealistic colour of the imagined or remembered. Nostalgic and sentimental, this work aims to remind viewers of the simple happinesses'.

We need more reminders of the simple happinesses.

Natalie Azzopardi has given us a thoughtful and evocative reminder in 'Beyond the Laughing Sky', her first solo exhibition. The process of painting the exhibition images also reminds us of a time when the hand had a more important place in photography. We are proud to share Natalie Azzopardi’s 'Beyond the Laughing Sky' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-12-08 18:00
2012-01-29 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 8 December 2011 to 29 January 2012
 
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Images: Katherine Griffiths, Pip and Pip #2

PhotoAccess offers residency opportunities to a number of artists each year. An aim of the residency program is to assist emerging artists to develop their practice and present work to a wider audience.

Support for artists in residence includes PhotoAccess membership, use of facilities and equipment, access to courses and workshops, help with grants applications, mentoring and advice, technical and creative support and, in some cases, exhibition opportunities.

PhotoAccess is a strong supporter of the ANU School of Art’s Emerging Artists Support Scheme (EASS): two of our residencies each year are awarded to School of Art final year graduates. Katherine Griffiths and Natalie Azzopardi are our residents from the 2010 graduating year. Support from the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy allows us to help emerging artists show their work as part of the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. For many this is their first solo exhibition, helping build a bridge between their student and future lives as contemporary visual artists.

Katherine Griffiths had a very busy year in 2011, with two residencies, two solo exhibitions and work in five group shows. Naturally Beautiful' is her first solo exhibition in a public art gallery and a good finish to the year.

The idea for the exhibition was first discussed with us early in 2011. It was unclear then how she might successfully and without sensation tell a story of the societal pressures on girls, as she says:

'… aged between 12 and 13, an age where [they] begin to shape their identity through physical appearance and body image. At this age, they are vulnerable to the various constructed ideals of beauty that are projected by the media and general pop culture'.

That Griffiths has done so effectively and with such subtlety and sensitivity is a tribute to her conceptual and technical skills. Her wall images reference the apparent need young girls have to project a more alluring and grown up image, an image that can lead to danger. The accompanying short film, Dance with me, is not quite so subtle as it points to the sexualisation of girls through the influence of pop culture and social media.

PhotoAccess is proud to present Katherine Griffiths’ 'Naturally Beautiful', including her short film 'Dance with me', to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-11-17 18:00
2011-12-04 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 17 November to 4 December 2011
 
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Introduction

This selection of strong, evocative panoramic works by Ed Whalan is drawn from the PhotoAccess Collection. Ed’s Beyond Border Town exhibition work was made in the course of a 2007 and 2008 project supported by PhotoAccess and a grant from the ACT Arts Fund, and first shown in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in April 2008. Ed donated the collection to PhotoAccess in 2008. A selection of Beyond Border Town images was also shown at X-Gallery, Bungendore later in that year and at the Australian Embassy, Berlin in October 2010. The brief essay and Artist Statement that follow are from the catalogue for the 2008 HUW DAVIES GALLERY showing of Beyond Border Town.

Ed Whalan is now living in Berlin but has contributed to members’ exhibitions since he left us in May 2011. More about Ed Whalan and his work can be found at www.ed.jingara.com.au

David Chalker

Artist Statement

I moved to the Captains Flat region in 2001 after returning from almost two years in the Northern Territory. During that time the cost of rental housing in Canberra had sky rocketed. I guess in the long run this worked in my favour because it forced me to look for somewhere to live in the surrounding district.

Captains Flat was more accident than planning. I knew nothing of the town or its history, let alone the people who lived there. At the time it had a population of around 400, one pub, one bowling/RSL club, a café and a post office—but no shop or service station. I used to joke that you could always get cigarettes and beer at the Flat, but not much else.

Seven years on the town has continued to redefine itself as more people like me move to the area, seeking relief from rising housing costs or a quieter life in what is still at heart a small country town.

Captains Flat is by no means unique in terms of its relationship with Canberra. Many small towns that pre date the creation of Canberra as the National Capital are within an hour’s commute. Over the years Queanbeyan, border town, has gained a reputation as Canberra’s less costly cousin, but relationships with Canberra extend well beyond border town.

Driven by my personal relationship with the town itself, the surrounding country and the people who live there, Captains Flat has become the primary focus for my take on what exists—the rich, surprising and complex community life—Beyond Border Town.

One drawback of living so far away from Canberra, but still reliant on it for work and services is that it forces you to be 100 per cent dependent on the car. The car changes our relationship with the country. Despite spending anything up to 15 hours a week traversing this landscape our interaction with it is limited by the flatness of the windscreen and the cocoon like environment of the cabin. The road becomes hypnotic and the country itself becomes part of the daily meditation process preparing for or winding down from work.

The selection of images in Beyond Border Town highlights small but significant aspects of the lives of some of the people dependent on the National Capital who choose to live outside its planned environment. Whether it is the roads they travel on, the collections they surround themselves with or simply the land they travel so far each day to call their own. This is just a glimpse of what exists Beyond Border Town.

Ed Whalan, April 2008

Catalogue

2011-11-17 18:00
2011-12-04 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 17 November to 4 December 2011
 
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PhotoAccess is pleased to present a second 2011 exhibition by Kerstin Styche, Identity Through Our Eyes, following her NAIDOC Week exhibition Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang (Strong Black Women) in July this year.

Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang was Kerstin’s exhibition as our fourth PhotoAccess Emerging Indigenous photographer, assisted by funding from the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy (VACS). This exhibition is the culmination of a Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) graduate emerging artist residency, also assisted by VACS funding.

2011 has been a busy and interesting year for Kerstin Styche, a Wiradjuri woman with family connections to Western New South Wales. Born and raised in Canberra, Kerstin graduated with a Bachelor of Design (Photography) from CIT in 2010. She works as a Senior Photographic Technician at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

As well as her two PhotoAccess residencies and HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions this year, Kerstin was presented with the Len Barratt Award for the outstanding CIT graduate in photography in October, and named ACT NAIDOC Artist of the Year in July.

We first saw her powerful black and white portraits in White Walls, the December 2010 exhibition by CIT students at the High Court of Australia. Kerstin was selected for 2011 residencies and exhibitions with us on the basis of that work, which she developed for the Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang exhibition. The images in Identity Through Our Eyes are new work, this time in colour and titled. As she says in her Artist Statement:

'Each individual comes from a different and distinctive cultural background but they are all Australian and all friends or people I know well … Often, names can act as indicators of an individual’s ethnicity. A name can be typical of a certain culture or sometimes they are simply names that you hear frequently. I chose to title each image using the individual’s first name to demonstrate their cultural background and also the diversity in the group'.

Identity Through Our Eyes, like Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang is about culture as a personal and group identifier—the earlier exhibition about the shared values of Indigenous women; in this exhibition about common national and generational values deriving from many distinctive cultures. Both of these thoughtful exhibitions are significant achievements by an outstandingly talented and insightful young photographer.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-10-27 18:00
2011-11-13 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 27 October to 13 November 2011
 
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I was driving when I heard Tony Stewart interviewed about his 'Use By' exhibition in April 2002. Puzzled and intrigued by his description of the work—an unlikely marriage of the humble bread tag and images made on a visit to India—I decided I should take a look.

'Use By' was a small but striking show. The works were complex, with minute individual and group portraits woven together by and shining through a grid of bread tags, each marked with its own use by date. The clear depth of Stewart’s feeling for humanity and the vitality and technical precision of his images made an impression on me.

Later that year Sasha Grishin reviewed Stewart’s 'Transit' at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, Manuka. In The Canberra Times of 4 October 2002, Professor Grishin commented that Transit was ‘… a very rich and rewarding exhibition, where cutting wit is combined with an engaging intellect.’

I met Tony Stewart when I became Director of PhotoAccess. Sasha Grishin’s description of the 'Transit' exhibition could also have been a description of Stewart himself, who is a long time PhotoAccess board member, generous supporter and regular contributor to group exhibitions. 'Tag', in September 2005, was first his solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

'Moral Ambiguities', Stewart’s second solo exhibition at PhotoAccess, includes work produced over the past three years. Again it is a quite complex show, conceptually and technically, drawing heavily on Tony Stewart’s humanist values and concern for the future of the planet—as suggested in this statement from the catalogue for our 25th Anniversary Life Members Show:

''Cesspool Earth' is a protest against inaction. None of us wants the world we are creating for our children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. But nations, governments, corporations and individuals do nothing, while everything goes to hell around us. For example, the Murray Darling Basin in Australia—the problem seems too buried in complex entitlements and interests but, as the previous Director of the basin authority said before she retired: ‘We know all the science and what needs to be done. All that is required is action’. Similarly, problems of the 6th great extinction (human caused over the last 400 years), declining biodiversity, declining fisheries, climate change, poverty, global pollution, even such things as health and education are not intractable, but certainly seem to be?'

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Tony Stewart’s thoughtful and provocative 'Moral Ambiguities' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-10-06 18:00
2011-10-23 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 6–23 October 2011
 
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Images: Jamila Toderas 'Raw Beauty'; Kerry Baylor 'Sally Can't Dance'

Hang it Yourself (HIY) was conceived as a photographic interpretation of street art, accessible to everyone, a bit anarchic, an easy ask creatively and financially for first time and experienced artists. But from the beginning with HIY 2008, HIY-time has become a worrying time for members. Their worries include the challenge of creating and presenting something noticeable, something different and something of quality. Those worries are visited on the staff of PhotoAccess and we willingly shoulder the responsibility of advising on selection, printing, placement and the many other concerns members bring to us at HIY-time.

Of course they needn’t have worried. HIY 2011 is again a great success, representing an astonishing variety of subjects, media and participants. With 202 images from 51 artists, including young members Tabitha Mann and Robert Agostino, HIY 2011 is the largest showing of HIY works in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

We are pleased with the number of members accepting the challenge and showing with us for the first time, including Robert Agostino, Mark Bassett, Lance Black, Julia Boyd, Christa Cordes, Sue Crickmore, Deidre Campbell, Carolyn Larcombe, Nadia McLeish, Raylee O’Neill, Steven Shaw, Margaret Verick, Margo Wade and Suan Chin Wong.

Ed Whalan has joined us again from Berlin with his intriguingly titled Transgenialian CSD Oranienstraße Berlin. Alan Edwards is showing in HIY 2011 after a long absence from members’ shows. Dominic and Ollie Barrington have ventured up from the South Coast and again contributed thought provoking and visually striking images. Mark Bassett visits the picturesque streets of Paris with a series of beautiful black and white inkjet prints. Jason Alo, Robert Agostino and Alan Charlton have presented hand made black and white prints fresh from the PhotoAccess darkroom. Julia Boyd has used the mediums of photography and watercolour paint to produce small, atmospheric images in Spectator 1 to 5.

The involvement of artists who have had solo HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions is very pleasing. This year they include Kerry Baylor, Andrée Lawrey, Marie Lund, Barbie Robinson, Lorna Sim, Tony Stewart, Belinda Pratten, Jamila Toderas, Holly Treadaway and Ed Whalan.

It’s unfair not to mention more of the images but members and other visitors will make their own assessments and take away from HIY 2011 ideas that, we hope, will help them with their work.

Congratulations to everyone who has participated in HIY 2011, making it another outstanding and memorable HUW DAVIES GALLERY show by PhotoAccess members.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-09-15 18:00
2011-10-01 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 15 September–1 October 2011
 
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Chris Morrison’s 'Majestic' is his first solo exhibition of photographic prints. In 2008 PhotoAccess invited Morrison to show his very impressive student work, 'Compressed', a multimedia piece based on 14 000 still images, in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room as part of our program for VIVID: The National Photography Festival. Morrison received an award as the outstanding VIVID emerging artist. Since then he has brought a new landscape focus to his work because, he says, ‘… whether it’s imagined or otherwise, I feel as though these places are alive and, sometimes, supernatural.’

Morrison has shown in a number of group exhibitions and received further awards since he and his wife made an influential grand tour in 2009. He has developed a strong visual language based on the emotions he experienced in the mountains, cities and coastlines of two continents. 'Majestic' also includes Australian landscape images from the large body of work developed over the past two years.

In 'Majestic', Chris Morrison has taken the time and invested the energy and skills necessary to honour his profound response to landscape in a group of beautiful images that are grand and transcendent. From the coast of New South Wales to the mountains of Europe and South America, Morrison has shared with us the reality of these paces and, more importantly, the awe they inspire.

PhotoAccess is delighted to share the work of this fine young photographer with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-08-25 18:00
2011-09-11 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 25 August–11 September 2011
 
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Image: Jocelyn Rosen, 'Duff'

Because of her strong contribution to PhotoAccess over a number of years—as a gallery volunteer, teacher, board member, board adviser and group show artist—it is fitting that Jocelyn Rosen’s first solo exhibition should be in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

'Night and Day' has been some time coming. The early stages of her working life took Rosen in various directions, mostly in the arts, but inevitably edging towards photography. As she has described that time:

'I began my career as an actor where I developed my love of imagery and storytelling. I initially planned on becoming a cinematographer and worked as a clapper loader for about a year on many short films. After that time I decided to review my career goals and took time out to think about what I really wanted to do. After a year working in bars in inner-city Sydney, volunteering at the Australian Centre for Photography, doing some work for photographer Mark Rogers and production running for Penta Group, I saw 'Age and Consent' by Ella Dreyfus and realised I needed to quit smoking and immerse myself in photography'.

After graduating from the Sydney College of the Arts Rosen found her way to Canberra and quickly immersed herself in the arts community. 'Night and Day', like much of the work she has produced since then, reflects the life and connections she has made here in a very intimate, personal way. As she says in her artist statement:

'The images in this exhibition are deeply personal. They document a phase from my life which was varied, often exciting and marked a lot of change for me. … These portraits are personal and candid. They are spontaneous responses to the day, the person, the place. I hope they appear both real and dreamlike—as memories always are'.

Unlike the more formalist work seen in most HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions, Jocelyn Rosen’s images have the immediacy and strong sense of immersion in place and time that candid photography can achieve. Are these images the decisive moments of her life at a particular point in time? I don’t think she is inclined to say it in words but, clearly, there is a strong storyline in the selection and titling of the works suggesting a period of sorrow, loneliness and reflection. A number of images refer to the life and passing of her grandfather in ways that could not be captured more eloquently in words. I am pleased others suggest optimism, friendship and humour and seem to imply, maybe, that her next major body of work will have a different tone altogether.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Jocelyn Rosen’s 'Night and Day' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-08-04 18:00
2011-08-21 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 4–21 August 2011
 
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Image: Kerry Baylor, 'The boys', 2011

This year members have four opportunities to show work in group exhibitions. Winter Holiday Snaps is the third members’ exhibition for 2011, a postcard show giving everyone a low cost, low pressure chance to share their work with others. We are particularly pleased with the number of members who have risen to the challenge of showing work in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY for the first time, including Christine Finch, Carolyn McKenny, Stewart May, Brenda Runnegar, Anna Sutherland, Peter Taylor and Helene Walsh.

As with last year’s Holiday Snaps, some members have brought back images from far away holidays, sharing a mix of exotic places and faces with us. Kerry Baylor often gravitates to the places of her childhood to bring back seemingly endless numbers of images of people playing around in and near the Merewether baths. She hasn’t let us down this year, with a group of outstanding images. Holly Treadaway uses the play of light on bare skin to pick out people in vast, dark river landscapes. Andrée Lawrey offers us beautiful images as usual of places where we’d all like to spend more time, as have Lorna Sim and Julie Garran.

Landmarks and street people jostle with quiet hills, micro studies of flora and big ocean landscapes. You can feel Ginette Snow’s seagulls swooping in to pinch stray fish and chips. Alan Charlton challenges the rules with an ingenious folding postcard set. While Sean Davey holidayed at Guthega and offers us a short story in a set of hand printed black and white images, Kate Luke holidayed at home. As with Holiday Snaps last year, there is plenty to admire and think about in Winter Holiday Snaps.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-07-14 18:00
2011-07-31 16:10
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14–31 July 2011
 
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Those clever politicians and their equally clever bureaucrats were having a lend of us when they came to naming Fyshwick. Fair enough to honour Sir Philip Fysh, a Tasmanian politician and important player in the story of Federation. But the ‘wick’, how does that work? From the old English, ‘wick’ means a place where people live. Who lives at Fyshwick?

Yet Fyshwick is inhabited all day, every day, for a whole host of reasons. At night sparsely populated (only speculating here), by day Fyshwick is as busy and vibrant as many whole towns. And like towns it has a dynamic all of its own—changing streetscapes, changing businesses, ever evolving to meet the diverse needs of the marketplace that is Canberra.

Barb Smith and Andrée Lawrey have a fascination with Fyshwick. Their commitment to producing this exhibition has been considerable and their visits to the streets of our best known industrial suburb have not been without incident. They have succeeded in showing us something we thought we were all familiar with in fresh and thought provoking ways. There is gentle humour in many of the images and a visual narrative that evokes the real character of this unique place.

Because Smith first visited Fyshwick with her camera many years ago, some of her images are of places that have vanished—either physically or as testament to the transformative power of paint. That she has chosen not to identify them acknowledges the transient nature of the businesses and buildings that make up the industrial landscape. Other images were made more recently. While recognising the subjects, people might be reminded of the evanescence that is the lot of us all, but particularly if your path is that of an industrial building.

Andrée Lawrey’s two images of 53 Collie Street perfectly illustrate the power of paint. Her beautifully precise first version, with its kind of convincing trompe l'oeil, contrasts astonishingly with the new livery. Hard to credit that it’s the same building and, I think, the same business.

Although the artists have chosen to work together on Fyshwick, their different ways of working and the separate presentation of their images reads as two solo exhibitions on a single theme. The work of each artist complements the work of the other in a very successful tale about a Canberra suburb few people have seen as a suitable place to make art.

PhotoAccess is very pleased to present Fyshwick in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-06-23 18:00
2011-07-10 16:00
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NAIDOC Week exhibitions in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY 23 June–10 July 2011
 
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PhotoAccess is pleased to present two exhibitions showing different aspects of Indigenous life in Australia for 2011 NAIDOC Week: Erub, July 1 by Bronwyn Jewell and Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang by Kerstin Styche.

Bronwyn Jewell is a life member and key figure in the history of PhotoAccess.

As Artistic Director through the 1990s Bronwyn helped consolidate the work of the first group of PhotoAccess members and workers. Bronwyn was committed to the strong community ethos established by our founders in 1984, including projects for people denied creative opportunities for many different reasons. Through projects she initiated or participated in Bronwyn Jewell provided community groups and individuals, including people from Canberra’s Indigenous community, with encouragement and the means to engage with photography.

After leaving her position on the staff at PhotoAccess Bronwyn returned to chair the board, playing a pivotal role in guiding the association through a period of organisational and financial stress. Her energy and commitment gave PhotoAccess its base and raison d’être as a 21st century visual arts organisation with a strong and continuing community focus. Through all these years Bronwyn contributed to group exhibitions at PhotoAccess, Canberra Contemporary Art Space and elsewhere in Canberra, and had three solo exhibitions—at Tilley Divine’s in Lyneham, and at the former Jardine Street Gallery and EJ’s restaurant and bar, both in Kingston.

In late 2003 Bronwyn Jewell moved to Brisbane to become Director of the Queensland Community Arts Network and then in 2009 travelled further north to work with the community on Thursday Island as manager of the Gab Titui Cultural Centre. She presented her first solo exhibition with PhotoAccess, The Shorncliffe Line, in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2008 and contributed to In for life, the PhotoAccess 25th Anniversary Life Members Show, in October 2009.

We value equally Bronwyn’s Jewell’s past contribution to the association and her continuing involvement with us through exhibitions, including this latest solo exhibition, Erub, July 1. With its focus on an important event in the cultural and spiritual lives of an islander community we thought it would complement very well the work Kerstin Styche has developed based on women from the Indigenous community of the ACT, giving us two perspectives on Indigenous life in Australia.

With their contrasting rhythms and colour palette the images in Erub, July 1 illustrate different dimensions of the celebration of the ‘Coming of the Light’: the strong and vibrant dress and movement of the celebrants and their ancient culture and the quiet, static iconography that refers to the origins of their spiritual attachment to Christianity.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Bronwyn Jewell’s Erub, July 1 in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre for 2011 NAIDOC Week.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-06-23 18:00
2011-07-10 16:00
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NAIDOC Week exhibitions in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY 23 June–10 July 2011
 
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PhotoAccess is pleased to present two exhibitions showing different aspects of Indigenous life in Australia for 2011 NAIDOC Week: 'Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang' by Kerstin Styche and 'Erub, July 1' by Bronwyn Jewell.

Kerstin Styche is a Wiradjuri woman with family connections to Western New South Wales. She was born and raised in Canberra and graduated with a Bachelor of Design (Photography) from the Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) in 2010. Kerstin is a Senior Photographic Technician at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS).

Kerstin Styche is the fourth PhotoAccess Emerging Indigenous photographer to show in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY for NAIDOC Week. We first saw her powerful black and white portraits in 'White Walls', the December 2010 exhibition by CIT students at the High Court of Australia. Kerstin has worked with our Education and Projects Manager, Sean Davey, and Stephen Best from Macquarie Editions to reinterpret the series, shown in full at AIATSIS in March this year, in a selection of six large (610 x 430 mm) inkjet prints on Harman Gloss Baryta paper and a boxed portfolio of all 15 portraits printed on 420 x 297 mm Harman Gloss Baryta paper.

In her Artist Statement Styche says ‘Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang portrays beauty, strength, courage and wisdom, mirrored in the haunting eyes of these strong black women.’ In my view these larger format prints, with their strong contrasts from black to white, extraordinary detail and beautiful skin tones meet her aims magnificently. We can see the strength of the women but also their essential humanity—an important achievement for a portrait photographer. Kerstin Styche is a high achieving young Indigenous woman and we are proud to help bring her work to the attention of the wider Canberra community in this, her first, solo exhibition in a public art gallery.

The exhibition and Kerstin’s emerging artist residency has been supported by the ACT component of the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy. Production of the portfolio has been made possible by a micro grant from the ACT Community Arts Office.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Kerstin Styche’s 'Walan Budhang Yinaagirrbang' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre for 2011 NAIDOC Week.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-06-02 18:00
2011-06-19 14:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 2–19 June 2011
 
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The 'Seeing Grasslands' exhibition is one outcome of a project that had its genesis early in 2010 when David Wong, a PhotoAccess member, saw the potential of photography to help raise awareness of the natural environment.

A successful application for assistance from the ACT Government’s 2010 ACT Environment Grants saw the project begin late last year with the aim of raising the profile of grasslands and encouraging interest in this highly threatened ecosystem, the natural environment generally and photography through community participation, online initiatives and this exhibition. The Molonglo Catchment Group has administered the project which has also involved Friends of Grasslands and PhotoAccess.

In November 2010, thirteen people with cameras took part in the first Seeing Grasslands photography workshop. The aim of the workshop was to encourage people to enjoy the grasslands and their photography and, hopefully, learn something along the way. Images from the workshop were shared with participants and the wider community through the Seeing Grasslands Flickr Group.

Since then the project team has developed the Seeing Grasslands blog, explaining what has been happening and what is about to happen with the project.

And now the Seeing Grasslands exhibition takes its part in this jigsaw of activities, with a selection of images from David Wong and well known Canberra photographer Chris Holly in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

PhotoAccess was pleased to support the Seeing Grasslands project because of our interest in stories and images that help us understand the place we live in. We are impressed by the diversity and breadth of the work that has been done to date and the level of community involvement the project has generated.

Wong and Holly have a serious purpose in this exhibition. The images are clear and well selected to give us an insight into the secrets of grasslands, places that are too readily overlooked. The celebrities of the natural environment are the rainforests and marine environments that take up so much of television programming and media reporting. But the environmental importance of grasslands needs to be better understood and this exhibition and the Seeing Grasslands project will play a part in addressing the problem. I like the whimsical approach the artists have taken to titling their work and nudging the subject closer to our everyday experience and understanding of the world. They have used a light touch to avoid the alienating effect an over emphasis on scientific terminology might have had on the viewing audience.

We are pleased that the Seeing Grasslands project appears to have successfully brought photography to the service of serious environmental issues and delighted to share 'Seeing Grasslands' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-06-02 18:00
2011-06-19 16:00
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HUW DAVIES GALLERY 2–19 June 2011
 
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Evgeniy Bastrakov + Veronica Boero + Karen Costanzo + Jane Greagg + Thea McGrath +
Ann Robb + Miguel Gallagher

Image Evgeniy Bastrakov, 'Sun: Down'

It’s fitting that our longest course in recent memory, if not of all time, should have our longest ever exhibition title. Einstein’s sage observation seems to sum up very neatly what is at the heart of the creative mind and, just maybe, gives ‘creatives’ an out on logic and organisation.

Evgeniy Bastrakov, Veronica Boero, Karen Costanzo, Jane Greagg, Thea McGrath, Ann Robb and Miguel Gallagher were well enough organised, though, to come though the late 2010 and early 2011 Work to the Wall course with Ed Whalan and agree on this title for a group of images made as one outcome of the course. All this and they have managed to show imagination and solid technical skills in a diverse group of works reflecting different and clearly very personal subject interests.

Work to the Wall was designed for people wanting to take a conceptual leap with photography and work towards a 2011 group exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. The course was intended to encourage participants to develop and produce a new body of work and also covered presentation options, including file preparation, printing and mounting, and writing and submitting an exhibition proposal. I know Ed put a lot of time and effort into Work to the Wall and PhotoAccess and the course participants acknowledge his support.

It’s interesting, but probably coincidental, that so much of the work is concerned with landscape and the natural world given recent natural disasters and current debate about the future for the planet. Ann Robb’s images start way at the top, with clouds showing their many moods, colours and positive or destructive potential. Veronica Boero’s ice caves are suggestive of the most intimate and fundamental foundations of life. Evgeniy Bastrakov gives us an unashamedly passionate tribute to the beauty in landscape. Karen Costanzo invites us to contemplate a world made up only of ‘peaceful, pleasant places’. Thea McGrath encourages us to find the ‘simple yet beautiful’ and comprehension of the bigger picture in the small details of Tasmanian beaches. Jane Greagg’s subtle and beautiful images on silk also build on elements of the marine environment.

Only Miguel Gallagher departs from the natural world theme, inviting viewers ‘… to contemplate the possibilities of the sleazy adventures, private business negotiations or simple holiday relaxing that has taken place’ in his rooms.

We are pleased that Work to the Wall seems to have succeeded in helping these members to develop new work for 'Logic will get you from A to B, imagination will take you everywhere …' and pleased to share the work with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-05-12 18:00
2011-05-29 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 12–29 May 2011
 
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Image Josh Dykgraaf, The Bureaucratic Machine

'Access all areas 2011' marks several significant events in the recent history of PhotoAccess. This will be Ed Whalan’s last involvement in a members’ show as part of the PhotoAccess team. He leaves this month, ending a long history as a member of staff, teacher, mentor and exhibiting artist. PhotoAccess and the ACT community owe a large debt to Ed and he will be missed.

On a positive note we welcome three new members of our team to 'Access all areas 2011': Sean Davey (Education and Projects Manager), Kate Luke (Administration Manager) and Josh Dykgraaf (tutor). Members will be familiar with Kate’s work. Sean and Josh are showing with us for the first time.

We welcome others who are showing in the members’ show for the first time, including Ulrika Sundholm-Barsley, Leandra Martiniello, Robin Cavalier, Dean Klemick, Veronica Boero, Stephen Corey, Ollie and Dominic Barrington, Marion Milliken, Ulli Brunnschweiler and four students from Canberra Girls Grammar School: Gabby Hall-Lomax, Ashley St George, Jessica Rainbow and Nadine Szydlik.

Seeing work on the wall, particularly in the context of a group show, is a valuable learning opportunity for artists and one of the very important outcomes of the exhibitions we present for members. Winter Holiday Snaps from 4 to 21 August and Hang It Yourself from 6 to 23 October are the next shows open to all members in 2011.

The continuing involvement of artists who have had solo HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions is very gratifying. This year they include Tim Anger, Kerry Baylor, Stephen Best, Ian Copland, Suzie Edwards, Lauren Hewitt, Payal Sehgal Mahajan, Barbie Robinson, Lorna Sim, Tony Stewart, Belinda Pratten, Erica Hurrell and Ed Whalan. Several members showing in Access all areas 2011 have exhibitions coming up in the next few months, including, Andrée Lawrey, Barb Smith and Tony Stewart.

Included in the show are board members and advisers who volunteer their time and expertise to help PhotoAccess with its work (Bob Burne, Lauren Hewitt, Belinda Pratten, Tony Stewart); staff members; tutors—Richard Scherer in particular; and volunteers (including Alan Charlton, Phil Carter, Susan Henderson and Andrée Lawrey).

Engaging and challenging work has become the standard for PhotoAccess members shows, and 'Access all areas 2011' continues the tradition.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-04-08 14:00
2011-05-08 16:00
Etc/GMT

Wendy Currie + Silvi Glattauer + Karena Goldfinch + Kara Rasmaris
 

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 9 April–8 May 2011
 
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Wendy Currie, Silvi Glattauer, Karena Goldfinch and Kara Rasmanis are Victorian artists who love the unique qualities of prints made by hand using alternative processes. Of course, some of the ‘alternative’ processes they use were standard processes not all that long ago.

'Re-imaging the Classic Print—From Digital to Handmade' was first shown in Melbourne, at St Kilda’s Obscura Gallery, in 2009. This HUW DAVIES GALLERY showing is their first exhibition together in Canberra and our most comprehensive exhibition of alternative process work.

The four artists have diverse areas of interest. While many of the processes they use have roots in the nineteenth century, the Cyanotype for example dates from the 1840s, they have adapted some digital processes to their ends. The photogravure prints of Silvi Glattauer and Kara Rasmanis combine 19th century photographic processes with 21st century technological innovations, bringing digital media and photosensitive photopolymer printing plates together with traditional etching techniques. One result of this marriage of the old and the new is a technique that—because it avoids the hazardous acids, asphalt and copper of the traditional photogravure process—helps create a safer working process for artists.

From the mid 1880s the Pictorialists strived to create images that were more than straight photographs. They believed fine art photographers needed to create more painterly images, and their images were carefully crafted impressions using filters or lens coatings, or heavily manipulated darkroom prints. Their dreamy interpretations of subjects paralleled the Impressionists and genre painters whose work was fashionable at the time. Many artists working with alternative processes today seem to share these beliefs and their hand crafted images have a strong affinity with images created more than a century ago. One difference is in their subject choices: the found and discarded objects in Silvi Glattauer and Karena Goldfinch’s work would not have found a place in the Pictorialist catalogue.

The images in 'Re-imaging the Classic Print—From Digital to Handmade' are beautifully made, carefully composed, full of mood and nuance. They could encourage more widespread take up of alternative processes in Canberra. To that end we are delighted that Wendy Currie has agreed to present two one-day workshops at PhotoAccess in conjunction with the exhibition. The first is a Cyanotype workshop on 7 May and the second, on the Van Dyke process, is on 8 May. Bookings can be made online at www.photoaccess.org.au

PhotoAccess is pleased to present 'Re-imaging the Classic Print—From Digital to Handmade' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-03-17 18:00
2011-04-03 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 17 March–3 April 2011
 
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'Scanning Memories' is one outcome of residencies in France by Nathalie Hartog-Gautier in 2006 and 2007. This return to the places, landscapes and memories of her country of birth was a basis for exploring very personal feelings about the old and the new in her life. Hartog- Gautier explained the journey in her exhibition proposal:

'In 2006/07 I was artist in residence at the Palace of Versailles and also artist in residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris where I researched my project of nature as a place of reflection and regeneration, collating the past and the present memories. I became an explorer/artist going through a journey between France and Australia looking at both landscapes in which to recreate a personal garden. During my residency at the Palace of Versailles I was given access to autochrome photographs held in the archives of Versailles and permission to print them as part of my artworks.

The move from a European landscape to Australia is profound … The process of associating two cultures is like making photo albums: there are only slices of life which compose a new approach to memory.

I have travelled and camped next to two very different lakes: Lake Mungo and Lake Cawndilla. Lake Mungo is a reminder of the original inhabitants of Australia and Lake Cawndilla illustrates the destruction of the landscape for the never ending need of water by migrants.

The collage of old and new images and texts form a narrative representing the multiple facets of an artist journey, the creative process of what I am and what I see of two countries, France and Australia'.

The images in 'Scanning Memories' are presented in hand made steel frames as a reference ‘… to the greenhouse where plants are nurtured and the space where the gardener works.’

Nathalie Hartog-Gautier is represented in public and private collections in Australia and overseas. She has an extensive record of exhibitions in solo and group shows. 'Scanning Memories' was first shown in Sydney, Adelaide and Swan Hill during 2009 and 2010 and is her first solo exhibition in Canberra.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Nathalie Hartog-Gautier’s work in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre

More information about Nathalie Hartog-Gautier is at nathaliehartog.com.au

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-02-24 18:00
2011-03-12 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 February–12 March 2011
 
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Lawrey.jpg
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Lawrey, Andree
Kewpie
67x54mm
inkjet print
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Brunnschweiler.jpg
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Brunnschweiler, Ulli
In the Zone 7
67x54mm
inkjet print
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Butselaar.jpg
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Butselaar, Monique
Woden Cats 1
67x54mm
inkjet print
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Baylor.jpg
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Baylor, Kerry
Walk this way
54x67mm
inkjet print
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Whalan, Ed
Jasper
67x54mm
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Chalker, David
Stinkhorn1
54x67mm
inkjet print
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Rattenbury.JPG
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Rattenbury, Shane
Windows
67x54mm
inkjet print
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Martiniello, Jenni
Bue Mood 7
67x54mm
inkjet print

This is the first of four members’ exhibitions in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY this year. Members should be readying themselves now for Access all areas 2011 from 12 to 29 May, Winter Holiday Snaps from 4 to 21 August, and Hang It Yourself from 6 to 23 October. Like all of our members’ exhibitions Canberra in a matchbox provides an opportunity for members to see and learn from, and be entertained by, what others are doing. It’s debateable whether the matchbox stuffing skills demonstrated in Canberra in a matchbox will be useful exemplars for future work, but the conceptual development and making of the images must come in useful some time, and members have produced work showing outstanding imagination and skill.

Who would have thought 46 members would rise to the challenge and strictly drawn (and rigidly enforced) rules of Canberra in a matchbox. Who would have thought they would produce 340 meticulously crafted works—little gems reflecting (some rather loosely) the place where we live. We are pleased to see so many members who regularly show with us supporting this exhibition and we welcome a number of first time participants, including Evgeniy Bastrakov, Anna Fansson, Konrad Reardon, Jerry Everard, Conny Koenderink, Ulli Brunnschweiler, Dean Klemick, Shane Rattenbury and Ryan Murphy. What a sight it is to see 340 Redheads longer safety matches handy packs ranged around the walls of the Multimedia Room, many to good effect in creatively and carefully arranged groups but others (at least one, something about Anthurus ancherii in some garden, sadly) in unimaginative and rather tedious straight lines. We can learn from the worst as well as the best of the entries.

PhotoAccess thanks Swedish Match Australia for supporting Canberra in a Matchbox, which we are very pleased to present for the first time in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-02-03 18:00
2011-03-13 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 3 February–13 March 2011
 
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This is the second successive HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition touching on war involving Australians. Chris Whitelaw’s The Shades of November was a moving story of our near neighbour Timor-Leste and the terrible experience of its people under Indonesian occupation. Eye on Afghanistan is about a place and people further away from Australia given prominence for a number of reasons—including the recent spate of deaths of Australian troops, debate about our involvement in the war, and the arrival by boat and controversy surrounding Afghani (amongst other) asylum seekers.

Eye on Afghanistan is the work of a group of highly motivated and compassionate observers of the Afghan people: Palwesha Yusaf, Virginia Haussegger, Sanaz Fotouhi and Gary Ramage. They have looked beyond the headlines to give us thought provoking picture stories communicating the human essence of a country mired for years in bloody conflict. Eye on Afghanistan was conceived as a way of changing perceptions:

'Our key purpose is to draw attention to the stories of the people of Afghanistan. It’s of great concern to us that much of the Australian media coverage of the war in Afghanistan focuses only on the military operations, and fails to acknowledge the people at the centre of this event. Through our exhibition we hope to humanize this story, and highlight how—despite the ongoing conflict—people are getting on with their lives, and going about their daily business. They are working, learning, laughing, gathering to share meals, and of course some are even falling in love and getting married …

This project … is our way—albeit humble and small—of honouring the very rich cultural heritage that sustains the people of Afghanistan. We believe it is a solid gesture towards fostering social harmony …'

Beautiful, stoic, tender, sad, joyous, Eye on Afghanistan suggests a myriad of human qualities and emotions. The people in these images are like people everywhere, but few in recent times have had to endure the hardship and horror of domestic and international violence like the Afghan people. Still there is laughter—take Virginia Haussegger’s Abdara school for girls; there is rhythm and dance, see Sanaz Fotouhi’s Halimeh, and new beginnings, First day of school; there is a continuing rich and distinctive culture, shown by Palwesha Yusaf in Tug of war and Virginia Haussegger in Fatima’s choice. But Gary Ramage tells us that the enduring big issue is warfare and the daily struggle for survival. The red dress is a blunt reminder of the confluence of innocence and murder in Afghanistan today.

PhotoAccess is proud to present Eye on Afghanistan— a project supported the ACT Office of Multicultural Affairs—in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 Feburary–4:30pm
 
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An exhibition and auction of photomedia works by friends of PhotoAccess in support of the
Queensland Premiers Disaster Relief Appeal

Guest auctioneer Genevieve Jacobs
666 ABC Canberra presenter

with work from:

Anger, Tim
Baylor, Kerry
Best, Stephen
Chalker, David
Delian, Lyndy
Duong, Jane
Edwards, Suzie
Ferris, Denise
Gallagher, Miguel
Henderson, Susan
Hewitt, Lauren
Jewell , Bronwyn
Lawrey, Andree
Luke, Kate
Mayo, Andrew
O’Day, Dan
Pratten, Belinda
Robinson, Barbie
Rosen, Jocelyn
Scherer, Richard
Sehgal Mahajan, Payal
Sim, Lorna
Smith, Barb
Stewart, Tony
Treadaway, Holly
Wasikowska, Marzena
Whalan, Ed
Whitelaw, Chris

Place your online bid now

We gratefully acknowledge the support of

• Artsound FM 92.7 / 90.3
• Create + Print Braddon
• Macquarie Editions
• Paperchain Bookstore
• Brianna Moloney, Body Shop at Home consultant
• Blue Illusion Woden

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Anger.jpg
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Anger, Tim
Chateau Fleur,
330 x 485mm
Canson Infinity Arches Velin
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Baylor.jpg
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Baylor, Kerry
Guardians of the Fort,2010
280 x 430mm
Museum Rag
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Best.jpg
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Best, Stephen
Sandholes Road 12,2011
250 x 250mm
inkjet print on Harman Gloss FB Al
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Chalker.jpg
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Chalker, David
Night, Salamanca Place,2010
310 x 410mm
Inkjet print to Hahnemühle Museum Etching Paper
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Delian.jpg
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Delian, Lyndy
Floodplain,2011
240 x 360mm
Inkjet print to sugar cane
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Duong.jpg
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Duong, Jane
Uluru Sunrise ,2010
458 x 300mm
Inkjet print to Rag Photographique
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Edwards.jpg
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Edwards, Suzie
Old Testament Sky II,
430 x 430mm
Inkjet print to Canson Infinity BFK Rives
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Ferris1.jpg
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Ferris, Denise
Untitled,
440 X 550mm
inkjet print to rag paper
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Ferris2.jpg
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Ferris, Denise
Untitled,
440 x 550mm
inkjet print to rag paper
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Ferris, Denise
Untitled,
370 x 470mm
inkjet print to rag paper
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Gallagher.jpg
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Gallagher, Miguel
Tree,
304 x 304mm
C6 Pegasus print
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Henderson.jpg
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Henderson, Susan
Roiling Sea,
300 x 300mm
Inkjet print to Canson Edition Etching paper
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Herrada.jpg
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Herrada, Gilbert
All about V and V,
240 x 359mm
Inkjet print
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Hewitt.jpg
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Hewitt, Lauren
Hudson,
304 x 304mm
Inkjet print to Velin Museum rag
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Jewell.jpg
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Jewell, Bronwyn
Storm Over Warraber Island,
340 x 513mm
Inkjet print
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Lawrey.jpg
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Lawrey, Andree
Highlights,
255 x 380mm
Inkjet print to Crane Museo Portfolio Rag
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Luke.jpg
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Luke, Kate
Kaleidoscope.,
760 x 513mm
Inkjet print to Arches Velin Museum Rag
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Mayo.jpg
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Mayo, Andrew
Martin Rotsey and Peter Garrett - Midnight Oil,1998
432 x 288mm
Inkjet print to Hahnemühle smooth rag
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O'Day.jpg
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O’Day, Dan
Rebecca on the Rocks,
310 x 240mm
Inkjet print
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Pratten.jpg
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Pratten, Belinda
The Surfer,1994
210 x 304mm
Inkjet Print to Canson Infinity BFK Rives
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Robinson.jpg
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Robinson, Barbie
San Marco Tea Room from See Venice and Die series,2008
300 x 455mm
Inkjet print to Hahnemühle Photo Rag Ultra Smooth
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Rosen.jpg
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Rosen, Jocelyn
Zoe's Secret,2011
230 x 304mm
Inkjet print to Harman gloss FB Al
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Scherer.jpg
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Scherer, Richard
Hong Kong Night,
450 x 300mm
Inkjet print to Epson Traditional Photo Paper
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Sehgal Mahajan.jpg
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Sehgal Mahajan, Payal
from the series Imperfect, Impermanent, Incomplete…,2003
480 x 690mm
Inkjet print to Archival Rag
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Sim.jpg
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Sim, Lorna
Untitled,
290 x 435mm
Inkjet print to Hahnemühle Photo Rag Ultra Smooth
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Smith, Barb
Tarantella,
270 x 204mm
Inkjet print to Arches Velin Museum Rag
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Stewart, Tony
Lake Mungo Lunette,
255 x 385mm
Inkjet print to Arches Velin Museum Rag
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Treadaway.jpg
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Treadaway, Holly
Goodna, Queensland,2011
240 x 360mm
Inkjet print
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Wasikowska, Marzena
from the sereis A Journey Reluctantly Taken ,
112 x 152mm
Inkjet print to Canso nrag
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Whalan.jpg
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Whalan, Ed
Untitled form the Berlin series,2010
960 x 170mm
Inkjet print to Photo Rag Baryta
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Whitelaw, Chris
Lake Eyre Dreaming,
279 x 419mm
Inkjet print to Epson Premium Gloss

Place your online bid now

2011-10-27 18:00
2011-11-13 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 27 October to 13 November 2011
 
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Paul Lau had been a member of PhotoAccess for some time when he first started to talk to us about an exhibition of images of the Australian women’s football team (the Matildas) in international competition. He had a large number of images from Matildas’ games, most of them straight sports documentary of the sort seen every day in the media. So the question we had to answer at the time was how might this work fit into the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program, a program that has as its main focus contemporary visual art.

Because some of the images were different—more revealing of the emotions and personalities of the players than the action itself—we took the risk of giving in principle agreement to an exhibition of Paul Lau’s then proposed images from the AFC Women’s Asian Cup 2010 in Chengdu, China. And Paul delivered!

'Conquering Matildas' is Paul Lau’s first solo exhibition. As an accredited photographer he attended most training and media sessions and every match at the Chengdu Sports Centre—extraordinary access allowing him to make images that would represent the Matildas’ battle to earn the 2010 Asian Cup title. Conquering Matildas is a small fraction of the images he made. He describes the work in this show as ‘… a collection of 18 images to capture the emotions, tensions and moments of elation experienced by this team of 23 young women.’

If there are any doubters who question the seriousness and legitimacy of women participating in sport at the elite level, 'Conquering Matildas' will help answer their doubts. As Heather Reid, Chief Executive Officer, Capital Football says in her Welcome Message, this exhibition ‘… will provoke, stimulate and challenge our perception of the female football player.’

The young women in these images are passionate and serious athletes, bound together by their obvious camaraderie and shared professional goals. We have the rare opportunity to share the gamut of their personal and group emotions through Paul Lau’s insightful work.

PhotoAccess is delighted to welcome this group of inspiring young women to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre in Paul Lau’s 'Conquering Matildas'.

Paul Lau was supported with aspects of the exhibition by Capital Football and Goal Weekly magazine.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-10-06 18:00
2011-10-23 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 6–23 October 2011
 
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We first saw Kiri Northam’s delightful Aridela at the end of 2010 in the graduating students’ exhibition at the ANU School of Art. Kiri Northam completed her Bachelor of Arts (Digital Arts) at the ANU in 2010.

A beautifully realised hand drawn animation, Aridela’s surface charm cloaks a serious message. Northam is concerned about the dumbing down of children’s learning. She says in her Artist Statement that ‘Ignorance is perceived to be preferable to the uncomfortable truth’.

Aridela is narrated by Jasmim Natterer.

Aridela and other short frilms by Kiri Northam can be found at www.kirifruit.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Kiri Northam’s Aridela to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-08-25 18:00
2011-09-11 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 25 August–11 September 2011
 
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Image: Amy Mills, '30 Days' (installation view)

It is easy to look at others with a camera. It is somewhat natural to look outwardly at the world in amazement, with intrigue and wonder. To a certain extent, the photographer must be involved with their subject to make compelling and interesting work but, no matter what happens, the photographer can always walk away if things get too difficult or too complicated. But Amy Mills doesn’t have the option of walking away from her subject; she has chosen to do one of the hardest things a photographer can do (honestly), to turn her camera on herself. Amy is both subject and photographer in her work No More Tears, a series of photographs made over one month in 2011.

Forty tablets a day, supplements, minerals, nasal flushes, injections, and mucus. These are some of the things Amy deals with on a daily basis. This is what is it like living with Cystic Fibrosis and diabetes. No More Tears is an intimate and courageous photographic self-portrait of a vivacious young woman made by a talented photographer. Direct flash highlights little details, and through these self-portraits the viewer is invited to experience Amy’s daily routine and to feel (only a fraction of) what it must be like living every day with her illnesses.

The compelling nature of this work makes me feel uneasy. It must be hard, and certainly it is sad. Then I look longer at the installation comprising three hundred small images (Amy made ten pictures a day for thirty days) and I smile. Moments of tenderness and love appear, good times with friends and touching images of Amy with her mum, pictures that we can all relate to and that warm the soul. I am no longer looking at a visual description of an illness; I am looking at the wonderful life of a beautiful young woman. Reality; Amy must self medicate every day, repetitive actions of swallowing tablets and using machines to breathe and to clean her lungs of mucus. Similar pictures are displayed over and over again and then I sense that sometimes Amy feels overwhelmed by what she is up against.

I cannot really imagine what it is like to live life the way Amy is forced to, but Amy doesn’t have a choice. In essence none of us really do, we play the cards that we are dealt and then get on with it. A small few, like Amy, do not pity themselves in the face of such circumstance; rather, they face life head on with courage, determination and a degree of cheekiness. No More Tears lives and breathes with Amy’s resilience and strength of character. Amy does not shy away from who she is or what she suffers from rather, by photographing herself, Amy is taking control of her illness and placing it within the context of her life; one that is full of love, family, friends, study, work and photography. Amy’s series of photographs reminds me how hard life can be for some people, while it simultaneously reveals just how precious and beautiful it really is.

Sean Davey

Catalogue

2011-07-14 18:00
2011-07-31 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14–31 July 2011
 
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Still from 'Keith', 2010 by Sam Thow; digital 3D animated film, 1280 x 720 px; 3:00 min

We first saw Sam Thow’s 'Keith' at the end of 2010 in the graduating students’ exhibition at the ANU School of Art. Sam completed his Bachelor of Arts (Digital Arts) with Honours at the ANU in 2010.

We were struck by the deeply melancholic tone of this beautifully realised short film and thought it should be made available to a wider audience. Sam was invited to show the work in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room this year and this is its first showing in a public art gallery. Sam has described the film as

'A pessimistic depiction of indistinct social and economical consequences in a not too distant future. In a crowded world, Keith is an elderly man who exists in isolation'.

The music was created by Matthew Rankin, a composition student from the ANU School of Music.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present Sam Thow’s 'Keith' to visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-06-02 18:00
2011-06-19 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 2–19 June 2011
 
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Margaret McHugh completed a degree with Honours in Photomedia and Media Arts (Video) at the ANU School of Art in 2010. We first saw her work in the end of year graduating students’ exhibition and invited her to show in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room this year.

Margaret is one of four 2010 Honours graduates who will be showing multimedia work with us in 2011. Graduating work, the result of an extraordinary investment of time, emotion and skill on the part of young artists, often disappears after the final year showing. Our program aims to give students an opportunity to present their work again to a fresh audience in a public art gallery.

Margaret McHugh defied convention and, inspired on by the death of Hollywood icon Elizabeth Taylor, made this new work referencing the glamour and sexiness (all fiction?) of other people’s lives. She proposes to make a video triptych about women and their expectations.

The audio track includes material from The Freesound Project: stereo field-recordings of a vintage hand-cranked pillar drill and treadle metalworking lathe. Driving the spindle is flat leather belt joined by riveting which makes a ticking/clicking noise as the rivets meet the pulleys.

The Song is an excerpt from State Trooper by Bruce Springsteen, which includes these lyrics:

Please don't stop me, please don't stop me, please don't stop me,
In the wee wee hours your mind gets hazy, radio relay towers lead me to my baby
Radio's jammed up with talk show stations
It's just talk, talk, talk, talk, till you lose your patience
Mister state trooper, please don't stop me

Hey, somebody out there, listen to my last prayer
Hiho silver-o, deliver me from nowhere.

PhotoAccess is deighted to present Margaret McHugh’s 'Please don't stop me' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY Multimedia Room

David Chalker
Director

Catalogue

2011-04-09 14:00
2011-05-08 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 9 April–8 May 2011
 
Noise for web.jpg
 

Video noise is the constant, background buzz that accompanies all digitally captured images. The filmic version of this is film grain, a physical characteristic of the film substrate, which gives a regular noise to all filmed footage. Both video noise and film grain are by products of the capture of light. They give the moving image character and a sense that the image is always changing, even with a still image.

We are accustomed to viewing images with noise, as this noise has accompanied all captured images for the past century. By contrast, generated or manipulated images that are noise free tend to look too ‘clean’ and hence artificial in comparison. It’s a simple process to average frames over time in order to reduce or remove grain, but this process also destroys the individual moment captured in each frame, smearing this instant across time.

I was struck by the comparison between noise and people; we tend to hurry from place to place, living in each instant, but not laving a physical presence over the long term. We move rapidly from moment to moment, unaware that our existence leaves little trace on time scales of minutes, days or centuries. Captured in the moment, our presence is real; when averaged over time, the ethereal nature of life makes itself apparent. We are defined by this transience.

Noise is an attempt to visualise this reality. The piece uses mathematical structures to move between different states of frame averaging; some of the selections are untouched while others have been averaged across 20 seconds. The greater this averaging, the more noise free the result. But as the noise is removed so are the people. The transience of life is revealed, leaving the viewer alone with empty landscape.

The sound component of this work uses similar mathematics to blend between different types of ambient sounds.

Paul Kirwan

See also Tim Brook and Paul Kirwan's detailed text at Noise

Catalogue

2011-03-17 18:00
2011-04-03 16:00
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 17 March–3 April 2011
 
South for web.jpg
 

While Marie Lund has a long history of professional involvement in the arts—as a photographer, painter, mixed media artist and art educator—Trevor Lund’s working life was as a physicist and engineer. Marie’s exhibition record is extensive, Trevor’s relatively brief. 'South' is the first major showing of his photographs.

Inveterate travellers, Marie and Trevor Lund went by sea to the Antarctic in 2009. Their month long journey, shared with other photographers and an expert Russian crew, was an epic photographic adventure. In this extract from an account of the journey they give us some idea of the reality of their experience:

'Storms and bad weather followed before we would reach pack ice. The air became cooler and as the temperature fell, we were surrounded by just sea and albatrosses, with before us the wonders of the Antarctic and the first icebergs. The steering of the ship around these icebergs was an art and, apart from their skills in seamanship, the Russian crew must have been good photographers too, for the sides they chose for us to view. We felt really very privileged, as everyone aboard was happy to share their photographic excitement and the places to stand. Photographing from the helicopter was exciting but not easy if you sat behind the pilot and tried to manoeuvre within the small space you had in order to take a shot, especially when next to you was the handle of the door!'

South is one very public outcome of Marie and Trevor Lund’s privileged journey through the still pristine waters of Antarctica. That the experience was worthwhile is obvious from the quantity and quality of the images they brought back. But it is also clear that there were moments of deep reflection and sheer joy:

'Every day brought something special—it is hard to describe which was the best! One of the richest days for us was the day we flew to the Dry Valleys by helicopter. The Dry Valleys should be called the Soundless Valleys. Taylors Valley is a place for meditation—we sat on a small hill surrounded by mountains and a glacier, the ground covered by grey yellow ochre stones and rocks, with no vegetation, but quiet, each of us rethinking the trip, life, love, the gift of being there ...'

This exhibition is the result of Marie and Trevor’s wish to share their journey south. The images have immediacy and clarity, capturing the diversity of Antarctic landscapes, the sometimes vast numbers and majesty of its faunal inhabitants and the great beauty of it all. But it is also a gentle reminder of what we stand to lose if mismanagement of the planet upsets the fragile ecosystems that make the last of our wild places so special.

PhotoAccess is very pleased to show Marie and Trevor Lund’s 'South' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

Catalogue

2011-02-05 16:30
2011-02-05 19:30
Etc/GMT

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 Feburary–4:30pm
 
marcspic.jpg
 


Online Catalogue and bidding

An exhibition and auction of photomedia works by friends of PhotoAccess in support of the
Queensland Premiers Disaster Relief Appeal

Guest auctioneer Genevieve Jacobs
666 ABC Canberra presenter

with work from:

Anger, Tim
Baylor, Kerry
Best, Stephen
Chalker, David
Delian, Lyndy
Duong, Jane
Edwards, Suzie
Ferris, Denise
Gallagher, Miguel
Henderson, Susan
Hewitt, Lauren
Jewell , Bronwyn
Lawrey, Andree
Luke, Kate
Mayo, Andrew
O’Day, Dan
Pratten, Belinda
Robinson, Barbie
Rosen, Jocelyn
Scherer, Richard
Sehgal Mahajan, Payal
Sim, Lorna
Smith, Barb
Stewart, Tony
Treadaway, Holly
Wasikowska, Marzena
Whalan, Ed
Whitelaw, Chris


Online Catalogue and bidding

We gratefully acknowledge the support of

• Artsound FM 92.7 / 90.3
• Create + Print Braddon
• Macquarie Editions
• Paperchain Bookstore
• Brianna Moloney, Body Shop at Home consultant
• Blue Illusion Woden

Image courtesy Marc Roberts, Brisbane 12 January 2011


Online Catalogue and bidding

2010-12-14 10:00
2011-02-11 16:00
Etc/GMT

Members are invited to enter an exciting new miniatures exhibition, opening on 24 February 2011.

Entries must be in person (no online entries) by 11 February, 2011.

The exhibition is called Canberra in a Matchbox, and members may to submit up to 10 entries. The entry fee is $5 per work.

Photographs must be taken within 100kms radius of Canberra and should reflect the exhibition's theme. This does not mean they have to be Canberra landscapes or monuments as we will accept a very broad interpretation as long as the spirit of the theme is respected.

Rules and Procedures

1. Entrants need to come into PhotoAccess in person on Tuesdays to Saturdays between 10am on Tuesday 14 December 2010 and 4pm on Friday 11 February 2011 to be issued with special PhotoAccess matchboxes and fill out an entry form. No titles are required at this time. Please note our opening hours on those days.

2. We will allocate to each entrant numbers to tally with the matchboxes. These numbers will become the catalogue numbers for the exhibition. We will keep your form and transfer your data to our catalogue.

3. A single photomedia image must be adhered to the inside tray of each matchbox and must be no greater than the size of that surface.

4. Work is to be delivered and hung in the Multimedia Room by the artists on Saturday 19 February between 12 noon and 4pm only. At that time we will give you your wall numbers.

5. You will also be required to enter titles on your entry form at this time.

6. Entries will only be accepted on our official matchboxes issued upon entry. The Redheads box cover must not be altered or removed and will form part of the exhibition layout.

7. The show will open on Thursday 24 February at 6pm.

8. Works will be offered for sale at $20 each and PhotoAccess will take 25% commission on sales.