Events

Thursday May 31, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Friday June 1, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Saturday June 2, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Sunday June 3, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Monday June 4, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Tuesday June 5, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Wednesday June 6, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Thursday June 7, 2012
End: 16:00
Start: 2012-05-22 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Townsend for web.jpg]

Samuel Townsend’s America is not the power hungry, politically divided, economically turbulent nation we hear and read about in the media. The America he experienced in 2010 was most of all inspiring, motivating him to make a body of still and moving images and journals that led to 'Postcards From Texas'. Referring to the people he met, his ‘superstars of the night’, and his response to them Townsend says:

'I was deeply moved by this contagious bravery sprawled across the American landscape/dreamscape and tried desperately to capture it somehow, holding on to it tightly through words and pictures, an action designed to bear witness to my memories'.

'Postcards From Texas' is geographically and stylistically half a world away from the quite formal family portraits of 'Bleeding Lines', Townsend’s first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 2006. Those carefully made images were about the ties and differences of young people living a fractured family life. But the idea of interrogating and celebrating shared experience is a strong thread through Townsend’s earlier and this recent work, a motive that appears to define his creative life to date.

While there is some gentle humour in 'Postcards From Texas', the overriding seriousness of tone tells us we need to properly explore the story Townsend is sharing with us on the walls, in his moving images and in his writing. From the ironic 'B. Obama on the Mantle' to the understated homage to America’s home of theatre and performance, 'Broadway', and the outstanding self portrait, 'The Picasso Room', there is an intimate, personal narrative here that will reward the time and imagination invested in reading.

Samuel Townsend was one of our two ANU School of Art Emerging Artists Support Scheme residents in 2006, leading to the 'Bleeding Lines exhibition. We are delighted to welcome him back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY with this strong and impressive work.

David Chalker

[inline:Townsend catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

End: 16:00
Start: 2012-05-24 18:00
End: 2012-06-07 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 24 May to 10 June 2012
 
[inline:Rufflet for web.jpg]

Christine Rufflet has been a PhotoAccess member for some years and first showed in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY in 'Access all areas 2008: the PhotoAccess members show'. She has contributed beautiful, thoughtful work to a number of group exhibitions since then, amongst them the image 'Sensualité' included in this exhibition and shown to a perplexed but admiring audience in 'Access all areas 2010'.

'Noble Conquest' is Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition. Unlike many of our artists, Rufflet has given us a comprehensive account of the real and imagined stories that lie behind the images in her exhibition and the motivation that has given rise to them. As she tells us, the horse has an ancient history in France and its revered status gave rise to the French popular saying ‘Horses are man’s most noble conquests’. Clearly Christine Rufflet agrees with this sentiment. She asks us to ‘see the gods and goddesses’ in her photographs and we are touched by the sincerity of her images and the story of her long personal relationship with the horse.

A documentary style exhibition based on this subject matter would probably not have found a place in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition program. The fact that Rufflet has worked hard and successfully to conjure up images that transcend the reality of each of her animals, investing them with qualities that require an effort of the imagination to read and understand, is a singular achievement. As she says in her Artist Statement many of the portraits have ‘… a soft, intimate and feminine atmosphere and a texture that is sometimes very close to the appearance of a woman’s body...’ Such was the quandary experienced by many who viewed the seductive 'Sensualité' for the first time in 2010. I’m sure it will receive a similar response this year.

PhotoAccess is pleased to present Christine Rufflet’s first solo exhibition and to share 'Noble Conquest' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Rufflet catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Thursday June 14, 2012
Start: 18:00
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

Start: 18:00
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Friday June 15, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Saturday June 16, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Sunday June 17, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Monday June 18, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Tuesday June 19, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Wednesday June 20, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Thursday June 21, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Friday June 22, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Saturday June 23, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Sunday June 24, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Monday June 25, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Tuesday June 26, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Wednesday June 27, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Thursday June 28, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Friday June 29, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Saturday June 30, 2012
(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Jones for web copy.jpg]

Brian Jones has developed a reputation as a fine, thoughtful photographer and active member of the Canberra photographic community since he joined PhotoAccess in March 2005 on his retirement from the Australian Public Service.

In a relatively short time he has completed a number of PhotoAccess courses, contributed to many PhotoAccess and other group shows, accumulated awards, served as President of the Canberra Photographic Society (CPS) and completed the Graduate Diploma in Visual Art (photography and media arts) at the ANU School of Art. 'Bowerbird Central' is his first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at PhotoAccess.

Jones’ only other solo exhibition was 'A glass half full: portraits of an age', his graduating exhibition at the ANU School of Art Gallery in March 2009. The images were monochromatic portraits in close up of older men and women, their vitality and character transcending the obvious physical impacts of time. The individual portraits were all strong and appealing. As a group the images made a powerful statement about the essence and strength of humankind.

Through a series of carefully chosen still and moving images Brian Jones gives us a privileged insight into the essence and strength of the Satin Bowerbird in 'Bowerbird Central'. While it is a common feature of our nearby forests, its relatively recent move to the city has added to the astonishing diversity and number of native birds inhabiting Canberra’s suburban landscape.

We can be grateful these birds chose to live in Brian Jones’ backyard because in his hands they are represented with fidelity, intelligence and, sometimes, humour. Jones shows us how fascinating and beautiful these birds are through two central characters, a juvenile male in Apprenticeship 1–13 (although Apprenticeship 12 is a female, showing the similarities of females and juvenile males) and a young male moving into adulthood with his shiny blue-black plumage (Transition 1–5). The importance of the bower means it is central to the lives of these birds and to the way Jones has chosen to tell their story. He enriches the story with moving images and ambient sound showing incidents in the daily lives of Satin Bowerbirds.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Bowerbird Central' by Brian Jones in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Jones Catalogue for web.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-06-14 18:00
End: 2012-07-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 14 June to 1 July 2012
 
[inline:Burton Taylor for web copy.jpg]

Most photographers when they travel look for colour, movement and the truth about place in urban settings, photographing people involved in celebration or active in the business of their daily lives. Jane Burton Taylor, who has worked as a travel photographer and journalist, discovered her colour, movement and truth—almost by accident—in landscape during a visit to Sicily some years ago.

It was a tentative thing at first: making images from a moving car, trying to convey a sense of living landscape with a fixed point of focus seen through foreground blur. After she spent some time back in Australia practising her technique, Burton Taylor returned to Sicily twice to complete the 'earth' series which has marked a significant change in her art practice. The 'earth' series moved Burton Taylor away from documentary and street photography to a way of working that lent itself to more universal themes. 'earth', as she says in her Artist Statement:

'By simultaneously capturing movement with a point of stillness in the landscape, the works signal the metaphoric relationship between the ephemeral and the eternal, the mortal and the immortal, the transient and the permanent'.

Images from the 'earth' series were first shown at Barometer Gallery in Sydney last year and an article discussing the work and Burton Taylor’s practice, Movement: The photography of Jane Burton Taylor by Don Norris, appeared in PhotoReview AUSTRALIA.

Few interstate photographers are included in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibitions program. Burton Taylor has been included because she has something important to share with us. There is the sheer beauty and presence of her large, luminous prints. There is the sweep and movement created by their presentation. And there is the coherent visual language Burton Taylor has created with landscape, landscape showing evidence of human intervention and representing the seemingly conflicting states of timelessness and mortality, stasis and change.

Jane Burton Taylor is represented in private and public collections, including the State Library of NSW and the National Library of Australia, Canberra. More about the artist and her work can be found at www.jbtphotography.com

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Jane Burton Taylor’s 'earth' with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Burton Taylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]