Events

 
03 / 31
(all day)
Start: 2012-03-15 18:00
End: 2012-04-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 15 March to 1 April 2012
 
[inline:Wodak for web.jpg]

Image: Josh Wodak, entre naturaleza y cultura

Josh Wodak visited Spain in 2010 and was made a PhotoAccess artist in residence last year to develop an exhibition based on the visit. Sense of Surroundings is an important outcome of the project. In recent years he has also had residencies at the ANU School of Art and the Australian Film Television and Radio School.

Since 2009 Josh Wodak has shown always thoughtful images in a number of PhotoAccess group exhibitions in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY, but this is his first solo show with us.

Wodak’s images in Sense of Surroundings achieve what most good photographers aspire to achieve, taking us to a distinct place and time, sharing something of the moment of creation. Writing about that moment Wodak says he ‘… sensed ‘something’, [but] making sense of that ‘something’ is ever elusive.’

This is an intriguing group of works, works that clearly have a narrative intent but contain few hints to help us read the artist’s ‘sense’, albeit elusive, of the places and people he has chosen to show. Wodak’s titles don’t make the task easier. But I suspect that is the artist’s purpose—to encourage us to take the time and make the effort to conjure up stories. And not necessarily the stories that might be told by Wodak himself or the unwitting players in these tableaux created with an eye sensitive to the interplay of character and place. The images are carefully and effectively composed and lit, and rich in local colour and imaginative possibilities.

The project was supported by the Spanish Cultural Cooperation Program between the Spanish Ministry of Culture and the ANU Centre for European Studies, and by Hang Ups Picture Framing. Stephen Best from Macquarie Editions printed the images. We are pleased to share Josh Wodak’s Sense of Surroundings with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Josh Wodak catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-03-15 18:00
End: 2012-04-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 15 March to 1 April 2012
 
[inline:Copland for web.jpg]

Image: Ian Copland, Samakand Market

Markets is Ian Copland’s fifth HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition and a real departure from his previous work. Structures, shown in 2007, was an outstanding first exhibition based on the architecture of three of Canberra’s national institutions. The people and streetscape of Garema Place, more than just a street address for generations of Canberra people, were the focus for Garema shown in 2009. People, 2008, dealt with universal themes of humankind and had no specific Canberra connection. Brindabella, 2010, examined places close to home in rich black and white landscape images of the iconic Brindabella Ranges.

In Markets Copland has gone much further afield, to the Silk Road, to places where the first meaning of the word ‘market’ persists today. This work is a slideshow with music. The format has allowed Copland to use many more images than he could have done in a print based exhibition and the accompanying music adds brilliantly to the images creating a lively, colourful and authentic story of the places he visited and the trade in food and other things essential to the people of those places and their daily lives.

This like all of his work reflects Copland’s abiding interest in people and places. He refers to this interest in his artist statement:

'In this slideshow I return to a personal love—capturing people involved in everyday life … In many cities and towns around the world markets or bazaars are the significant focal point for the community They are a true reflection of the culture of the local community. Wherever I have travelled I have been drawn to this ‘real’ look at the local people and culture'

PhotoAccess is pleased to welcome Ian Copland back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY, this time in the Multimedia Room, with Markets.

[inline:Ian Copland.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 1
End: 16:00
Start: 2012-03-15 18:00
End: 2012-04-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 15 March to 1 April 2012
 
[inline:Wodak for web.jpg]

Image: Josh Wodak, entre naturaleza y cultura

Josh Wodak visited Spain in 2010 and was made a PhotoAccess artist in residence last year to develop an exhibition based on the visit. Sense of Surroundings is an important outcome of the project. In recent years he has also had residencies at the ANU School of Art and the Australian Film Television and Radio School.

Since 2009 Josh Wodak has shown always thoughtful images in a number of PhotoAccess group exhibitions in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY, but this is his first solo show with us.

Wodak’s images in Sense of Surroundings achieve what most good photographers aspire to achieve, taking us to a distinct place and time, sharing something of the moment of creation. Writing about that moment Wodak says he ‘… sensed ‘something’, [but] making sense of that ‘something’ is ever elusive.’

This is an intriguing group of works, works that clearly have a narrative intent but contain few hints to help us read the artist’s ‘sense’, albeit elusive, of the places and people he has chosen to show. Wodak’s titles don’t make the task easier. But I suspect that is the artist’s purpose—to encourage us to take the time and make the effort to conjure up stories. And not necessarily the stories that might be told by Wodak himself or the unwitting players in these tableaux created with an eye sensitive to the interplay of character and place. The images are carefully and effectively composed and lit, and rich in local colour and imaginative possibilities.

The project was supported by the Spanish Cultural Cooperation Program between the Spanish Ministry of Culture and the ANU Centre for European Studies, and by Hang Ups Picture Framing. Stephen Best from Macquarie Editions printed the images. We are pleased to share Josh Wodak’s Sense of Surroundings with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY.

David Chalker

[inline:Josh Wodak catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

End: 16:00
Start: 2012-03-15 18:00
End: 2012-04-01 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 15 March to 1 April 2012
 
[inline:Copland for web.jpg]

Image: Ian Copland, Samakand Market

Markets is Ian Copland’s fifth HUW DAVIES GALLERY exhibition and a real departure from his previous work. Structures, shown in 2007, was an outstanding first exhibition based on the architecture of three of Canberra’s national institutions. The people and streetscape of Garema Place, more than just a street address for generations of Canberra people, were the focus for Garema shown in 2009. People, 2008, dealt with universal themes of humankind and had no specific Canberra connection. Brindabella, 2010, examined places close to home in rich black and white landscape images of the iconic Brindabella Ranges.

In Markets Copland has gone much further afield, to the Silk Road, to places where the first meaning of the word ‘market’ persists today. This work is a slideshow with music. The format has allowed Copland to use many more images than he could have done in a print based exhibition and the accompanying music adds brilliantly to the images creating a lively, colourful and authentic story of the places he visited and the trade in food and other things essential to the people of those places and their daily lives.

This like all of his work reflects Copland’s abiding interest in people and places. He refers to this interest in his artist statement:

'In this slideshow I return to a personal love—capturing people involved in everyday life … In many cities and towns around the world markets or bazaars are the significant focal point for the community They are a true reflection of the culture of the local community. Wherever I have travelled I have been drawn to this ‘real’ look at the local people and culture'

PhotoAccess is pleased to welcome Ian Copland back to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY, this time in the Multimedia Room, with Markets.

[inline:Ian Copland.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 2
04 / 3
04 / 4
04 / 5
Start: 18:00
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Start: 18:00
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

Start: 18:00
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 6
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 7
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 8
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 9
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 10
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 11
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 12
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 13
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 14
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 15
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 16
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 17
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 18
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 19
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 20
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 21
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 22
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 23
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 24
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 25
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 26
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 27
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 28
(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

(all day)
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 29
End: 16:00
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Spence for web.jpg]

I remember with mixed feelings growing up in a Goulburn version of the abandoned shop in William Street (catalogue number 19). There’s more than just a ring of familiarity about these words Alison Spence uses to describe places she refers to as ‘built ephemera’:

'Many corner stores were family businesses linked to the home. Local milk bars give the feeling of visiting someone's home. Smells of home cooked meals, distant sounds of a television, as the owner emerges from a doorway covered in a multi-coloured plastic strip curtain'.

Some of the details are different but the sense of the shop and our lives there is unmistakeably real. Our corner store was a community centre, a place people visited to buy potatoes and milk, fruit and cheese—and milkshakes and mixed lollies. And, annoyingly sometimes, just to visit, spending very little but wanting companionship and gossip to help pass the hours. Often they knocked on the back door after the shop closed to buy milk, saying church had finished late or offering many implausible excuses for the interruption. Then Woollies arrived and everything changed!

Alison Spence has been involved with PhotoAccess for some years. She has contributed work to group exhibitions but 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is her first solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. It was worth the wait. Spence has taken what might be thought of as commonplace subject matter and created a world of images evoking familiar memories and a little regret. This is more than a catalogue of unfashionable, out of date building styles and advertising slogans. 'Milkshakes & Mixed Lollies' is a reminder of the small things that make up community and the risks that come from a way of thinking that insists only the biggest and newest things are best.

Spence’s mix of black and white and colour images works very effectively to distinguish the built form of a vanishing genre from the beckoning images and words inviting people to buy. I like the flat, near to abstract quality of the advertising slogans and, unlike their more contemporary counterparts, the modest claims they make for the products they promote: ‘Enjoy Coca Cola’, ‘Drink Tarax Icy Cold’ and ‘Fresh NSW Milk’. There’s something to be said for simplicity, but would this approach stand up to the ‘sophistication’ of marketing today?

PhotoAccess is delighted to share Alison Spence’s 'Milkshakes & Mixed' Lollies with visitors to the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Alison Spence catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

End: 16:00
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Baylor for web.jpg]

'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s second solo exhibition in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY. I described her first, Watson, in 2008 as ‘… a serious, memorable exhibition’. 'Saturday Morning Water' is no less serious and memorable.

If the secret to making good images is to keep at it, Kerry Baylor’s persistent image making was always bound to produce many remarkable reflections on the places and people she encounters in her daily life. Her dedication to capturing the moment has resulted in a vast collection of work, from quick impressions of bus stop crowds to what I think is an important body of images made at Newcastle’s Merewether baths over a number of years.

We have seen examples of these images in recent group shows, but 'Saturday Morning Water' is Kerry Baylor’s first attempt to tell the more comprehensive story of Merewether beach, a place where she spent important formative years and a place she revisits regularly—always with a camera or two in hand, a distinctive eye and a very active imagination.

Baylor’s take on the world is affectionately quirky. She reads the mood of situations she finds herself in according to that philosophy, often producing photographs that are superficially amusing but ultimately very truthful. 'Saturday Morning Water' includes many good examples, like the two matching middle aged men contemplating the universe with a look of knowing acceptance (Untitled 12), and a contrasting group of teenagers clinging to the side of the baths looking with a sense of excitement and some tension for their next thrill (Untitled 3). Composition and colour reinforces the mood of these subjects to produce two quite memorable images among many.

There is a timeless quality in Kerry Baylor’s Merewether work. Many of the images look as though they could have been made thirty years ago, but taken together they tell of a place firmly in the present and deeply rooted in the hearts, minds and daily life of a local community. As a group the images in Saturday Morning Water and the large number of others made by Baylor over recent years are an important social document reflecting the diversity and richness of opportunities for socialisation and entertainment offered by the many beach side places in Australia. There is something elemental and precious about such places, something that should never be lost in our relentless quest to develop, improve and exploit.

PhotoAccess is delighted to present 'Saturday Morning Water' in the HUW DAVIES GALLERY at the Manuka Arts Centre.

David Chalker

[inline:Kerry Baylor catalogue.pdf=Catalogue]

End: 16:00
Start: 2012-04-05 18:00
End: 2012-04-29 16:00

HUW DAVIES GALLERY 5 to 29 April 2012
 
[inline:Growing Gungahlin.jpg]

Image: 'Growing Gungahlin', Ruth Hingston

Slow, quirky and very Canberra, 'Untitled Moments' is a digital animation based on embroidery.

'Untitled Moments' is a collaborative project exploring the visual impact of embroidery, drawing and photography in a digital animation. We've used digital technologies to combine embroidered images with drawing and sound to create narrative fragments: imagined incidents drawn from our observations of Canberra's most unremarkable moments.

The resulting work does NOT attempt to mimic cartoons or conventional animations. It's a pastiche, an idiosyncratic mixture of embroidery, drawing, watercolour, photography, scanography, digital animation, field recordings and digitally generated sounds. The final effect is sometimes contemplative, sometimes deliberately cheesy.

Ruth and Tim

[inline:Room sheet for web.pdf=Catalogue]

04 / 30